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31 - 40 of 72 results for: CSI::health

HUMBIO 154C: Cancer Epidemiology

Clinical epidemiological methods relevant to human research in cancer will be the focus. The concepts of risk; case control, cohort, and cross-sectional studies; clinical trials; bias; confounding; interaction; screening; and causal inference will be introduced and applied. Social, political, economic, and ethical controversies surrounding cancer screening, prevention, and research will be considered. Human Biology 154 courses can be taken separately or as a series. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or Biology Foundations or equivalent, or instructor consent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fisher, P. (PI)

INDE 225: Popular and Clinical Nutrition: Food Facts, Fads, and Pharmacology

Designed for medical students and other health care professionals. Lunchtime lectures review the epidemiological and clinical research related to eating patterns and misconceptions of the public, the mechanisms of pharmacological effects of food, and related topics common to patient nutritional concerns. Topics include fad diets, the impact of dietary addiction, longevity associated with caloric restriction, toxins in foods and the action of phytonutirents. Epidemiological, clinical, and biochemical studies are reviewed in the discussion of these and other topics.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 206B: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 368B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturer more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 200: Primary Care Presentations

This course is a lecture series offered during the winter quarter. The aim of this seminar is to allow medical students to experience the mindset of primary care physicians in real time. Classes feature presentations of patient cases submitted by Stanford faculty. Faculty presenters are provided with the diagnostic information for the cases in a sequential manner during and not in advance of each class, allowing students to learn from the thought process of physicians in real time as they put together the differential diagnosis, interpret diagnostic information, deliberate treatment and management options, and discuss other thoughts about the cases.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

MED 229: Introduction to Global Health

Provides an overview of global health and how it is similar to and different from public health and tropical medicine. Topics include the evolution, economics, politics of global health, major players in global health, and issues of geography, politics, humanitarianism, human rights, science, research, culture and disease.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 232: Virtual Student Exchange in Global Health between Lebanon and Stanford

Timely topics in global health will be presented in a unique virtual student exchange with the joint participation of the Modern University for Business & Science in Beirut, Lebanon. The goal of this interactive series will be to encourage students to think about a broad range of topics in global health including coordinated responses to crises, ethical approaches to research and implementation work in low-income countries, and focused sessions on refugee health which will connect classrooms in Beirut and in Palo Alto. Complex humanitarian emergencies require cross-cultural collaboration, and this class will be structured to encourage working with overseas counterparts on the pressing Syrian refugee crisis. By integrating lectures, guest speakers, and a cross-cultural collaborative capstone project, students will gain an in-depth understanding of the global-health landscape and methods of addressing complex issues with partners abroad. Undergraduates must take this course for a letter more »
Timely topics in global health will be presented in a unique virtual student exchange with the joint participation of the Modern University for Business & Science in Beirut, Lebanon. The goal of this interactive series will be to encourage students to think about a broad range of topics in global health including coordinated responses to crises, ethical approaches to research and implementation work in low-income countries, and focused sessions on refugee health which will connect classrooms in Beirut and in Palo Alto. Complex humanitarian emergencies require cross-cultural collaboration, and this class will be structured to encourage working with overseas counterparts on the pressing Syrian refugee crisis. By integrating lectures, guest speakers, and a cross-cultural collaborative capstone project, students will gain an in-depth understanding of the global-health landscape and methods of addressing complex issues with partners abroad. Undergraduates must take this course for a letter grade and 3 units. MD students can enroll for 1-2 units, yet the course will require 2 units worth of work. Students enrolling in the course for a third unit will create a podcast related to a topic of their choice on refugee health. These students will participate in a weekly section to develop their podcast with the teaching team as well as learn from guest speakers different podcast communication skills. This extra section time will be announced based off of students' and the teaching teams' schedules. The student who makes the best podcast will travel to Beirut to meet and work with their counterparts for a week during winter break. This course will be limited to 20 students. Students will fill out an application after the first day of class to determine enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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