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1 - 10 of 57 results for: CSI::energy-environment ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIO 117: Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, EARTHSYS 217, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 234: Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective (BIO 144, HUMBIO 112)

BIO 144: Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective ( BIO 234, HUMBIO 112)nPrinciples and application of the science of preserving biological diversity. Conceptually, this course is designed to explore the major components relevant to the conservation of biodiversity, as exemplified by the Latin American region. The conceptual frameworks and principles, however, should be generally applicable, and provide insights for all regions of the world. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Biology majors. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or BIO 43 or HUMBIO 2A or BIO 81 and 84 or consent of instructor. All students will be expected to conduct a literature research exercise leading to a written report, addressing a topic of their choosing, derived from any of the themes discussed in class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CEE 100: Managing Sustainable Building Projects

Managing the life cycle of buildings from the owner, designer, and contractor perspectives emphasizing sustainability goals; methods to define, communicate, coordinate, and manage multidisciplinary project objectives including scope, quality, life cycle cost and value, schedule, safety, energy, and social concerns; roles, responsibilities, and risks for project participants; virtual design and construction methods for product, organization, and process modeling; lifecycle assessment methods; individual writing assignment related to a real world project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/M.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

CEE 176A: Energy Efficient Buildings

Quantitative evaluation of technologies and techniques for reducing energy demand of residential-scale buildings. Heating and cooling load calculations, financial analysis, passive-solar design techniques, water heating systems, photovoltaic system sizing for net-zero-energy all-electric homes. Offered for 3 or 4 units; the 4-unit option includes a lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Masters, G. (PI)

CEE 176B: 100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything (CEE 276B)

This course discusses elements of a transition to 100% clean, renewable energy in the electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industrial sectors for towns, cities, states, countries, and companies. It examines wind, solar, geothermal, hydroelectric, tidal, and wave characteristics and resources; electricity, heat, cold and hydrogen storage; transmission and distribution; matching power demand with supply on the grid: efficiency; replacing fossil with electric appliances and machines in the buildings and industry; energy, health, and climate costs and savings; land requirements; feedbacks of renewables to the atmosphere; and 100% clean, renewable energy roadmaps to guide transitions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

CEE 207A: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each fall (see syllabus for updated list), but may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose two field trips from approximately 8 that are offered. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter ¿ students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5

CEE 224A: Design and Operation of Integrated Infrastructure Systems

In the next decade, countries will spend trillions of dollars on built infrastructure, the effect of which is to preserve our isolated infrastructure systems¿ status quo. Regulatory bodies like Public Utility Commissions (PUC) have unintentionally institutionalized this effect, with sometimes disastrous results, when in fact these isolated systems interact in ways that create new opportunities and new challenges. Infrastructure can be made more flexible and resilient but only when we know how to design, interconnect, and operate urban systems as an integrated whole, and when quality of life is the explicit motivation. These systems include Energy, Transportation, Communication, Water, Air, Green Space and Geophysical systems.nnThis class will introduce the basics of current infrastructure systems and explore in greater depth how these systems can be integrated in design and in operations. During the first half of the quarter, class lectures and guest speakers will develop the principle more »
In the next decade, countries will spend trillions of dollars on built infrastructure, the effect of which is to preserve our isolated infrastructure systems¿ status quo. Regulatory bodies like Public Utility Commissions (PUC) have unintentionally institutionalized this effect, with sometimes disastrous results, when in fact these isolated systems interact in ways that create new opportunities and new challenges. Infrastructure can be made more flexible and resilient but only when we know how to design, interconnect, and operate urban systems as an integrated whole, and when quality of life is the explicit motivation. These systems include Energy, Transportation, Communication, Water, Air, Green Space and Geophysical systems.nnThis class will introduce the basics of current infrastructure systems and explore in greater depth how these systems can be integrated in design and in operations. During the first half of the quarter, class lectures and guest speakers will develop the principles of infrastructure design and operations. The focus of the second half of the quarter will be directed student research to explore in greater detail the integration of two or more infrastructure systems, concluding with a written paper and class presentation.nnAt the end of this course students will have a framework for understanding integrated infrastructure design from multiple engineering and civic perspectives. Specific topics will be: n- Boundaries and boundary conditions between Built Urban Infrastructure Systems and Natural Urban infrastructure Systems n- Materials and Energy Flows between Built and Natural Urban Systemsn- Quantifying and Normalizing Urban Materials and Energy Flowsn- Basis of physical control of Infrastructure Systemsn- Basis of legal and economic control of Infrastructure systemsn- Metrics to evaluate single system and integrated system performancenStudents must submit an application for admission to this course: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfxTP9MWxbOMJOYXOA3kK1ZWAPJHCkptxaXfGQ80o0Nz7d6cA/viewform?usp=sf_link
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

CEE 226E: Advanced Topics in Integrated, Energy-Efficient Building Design

This class explores innovative methods for designing, developing, and financing high performance low carbon buildings. At this pivotal moment, as building codes in California and around the world move towards decarbonization and all electric buildings, this class will perfectly position students to enter the field of the built environment with the ideal tools and knowledge to tackle the quickly changing industry. Students will learn best practices to reduce energy and integrate solar PV generation and energy storage in commercial buildings in pursuit of Net Zero Energy and Net Zero Carbon buildings. The class is taught by Peter Rumsey, a widely recognized global leader in energy efficiency and sustainable building design, who has directed the design of 20 LEED Platinum Certified, 3 Living Building Challenge and 22 Net Zero projects worldwide. Lectures also include presentations and panels featuring several other foremost experts and practitioners in the field of green buildings. Option more »
This class explores innovative methods for designing, developing, and financing high performance low carbon buildings. At this pivotal moment, as building codes in California and around the world move towards decarbonization and all electric buildings, this class will perfectly position students to enter the field of the built environment with the ideal tools and knowledge to tackle the quickly changing industry. Students will learn best practices to reduce energy and integrate solar PV generation and energy storage in commercial buildings in pursuit of Net Zero Energy and Net Zero Carbon buildings. The class is taught by Peter Rumsey, a widely recognized global leader in energy efficiency and sustainable building design, who has directed the design of 20 LEED Platinum Certified, 3 Living Building Challenge and 22 Net Zero projects worldwide. Lectures also include presentations and panels featuring several other foremost experts and practitioners in the field of green buildings. Optional site visits to local innovative Net Zero Energy and LEED buildings provide context to support lectures. CEE 176A and CEE 156/256 or similar courses are recommended prerequisites but not required. All students are expected to participate in a group-based, term project focused on the design and development of a Net Zero Energy building.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Rumsey, P. (PI)

CEE 255: Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE (CEE 155)

Introduce the design and implementation of sensor networks for monitoring the built and natural environment. Emphasis on the integration of modern sensor and communication technologies, signal processing and statistical models for network data analysis and interpretation to create practical deployments to enable sustainable systems, in areas such as energy, weather, transportation and buildings. Students will be involved in a practical project that may involve deploying a small sensor system, data models and analysis and signal processing. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
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