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41 - 50 of 61 results for: CSI::energy-environment ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENERGY 160: Uncertainty Quantification in Data-Centric Simulations (ENERGY 260)

This course provides a brief survey of mathematical methods for uncertainty quantification. It highlights various issues, techniques and practical tools available for modeling uncertainty in quantitative models of complex dynamic systems. Specific topics include basic concepts in probability and statistics, spatial statistics (geostatistics and machine learning), Monte Carlo simulations, global and local sensitivity analyses, surrogate models, and computational alternatives to Monte Carlo simulations (e.g., quasi-MC, moment equations, the method of distributions, polynomial chaos expansions). Prerequisites: algebra ( CME 104 or equivalent), introductory statistics course ( CME 106 or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 171: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 271)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 214: The Global Price of Oil

Understanding the current and future price of oil requires the synthesis of geologic, engineering, financial, geopolitical, and macroeconomic information. In this seminar, we will build a global supply curve for petroleum by studying the marginal and full-cycle production costs for each of the major resource categories. We will study how reserve classification varies globally, and how global petroleum resources and reserves have changed and are likely to change over time. We will further investigate how the time lag between resource discovery, project sanctioning, and full production will affect future supply. Finally, we will study the elasticity of oil demand and how that demand is likely to change over time as the developing world gets richer and as competition from other energy sources increases.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 271: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 171)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENVRES 225: E-IPER Current Topics Seminar

For E-IPER Ph.D and Joint M.S. students only. Weekly presentations of E-IPER students' research and other program-related projects. Occasional guest speakers. Individual or team presentation, active participation, and regular attendance required for credit. May be taken for credit a maximum of two times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barsom, S. (PI)

ENVRES 280: Topics in Environment and Resources

Required core course restricted to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. This course functions as a gateway to fundamental concepts in environment, energy and sustainability. Topics include climate change, ecosystem services, life cycle assessment, energy systems, food systems, and others. Students engage with affiliated faculty, and begin to develop ways to integrate science and technology with business, law and other professional skills to solve environment and resource problems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENVRES 290: Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources

Required for and limited to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. Propose, conduct and publicly present final individual or team projects demonstrating the integration of professional (M.B.A., J.D., or M.D.) and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees. Presentation and submission of final product required. 3 total units required; can all be taken during one quarter or divided over two sequential quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENVRES 380: Innovating Large Scale Sustainable Transformations (SUST 230)

This class establishes innovation of systemic transformations as a crucial leadership modality. It gives students the mindsets, theoretical framework, and hands-on experience in shaping innovative interventions that bring about scaled and profound transformations in the face of complex multi-factorial challenges. Students are immersed in the Deep Change Methodology, which combines systems thinking, strategy, design thinking, behavioral sciences, resilience theory, diffusion theory, decision theory, and a theoretical framework around scaled multistake-holder interventions. Tools and theories introduced in class will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create sustainability and resilience on environmental, societal, and economic fronts. This project-based team-based class challenges students to find solutions for complex real world challenges. Consent of instructor required. Class meets Fridays starting week 2 (April 13th), for 8 weeks at 9.30am - 4.20pm. Week 9 presentations (June 1st) 3.00pm - 8.00pm.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 270: Analyzing land use in a globalized world (ESS 170)

This course examines the dynamics of land use in relation to globalization. The objective is to understand how the expansion of global trade, and public and private regulations affect land use changes. The course will enable students to better understand how to effectively influence land use change, from different vantage points (government, NGO, corporate actor¿). The main emphasis is on tropical regions. Lectures introduce theories, practical cases, and evaluation tools to better understand contemporary land use dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lambin, E. (PI)

ESS 280: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (EARTHSYS 180)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing. Application required. Deadline: September 12 for Autumn. nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6Md7jndlBIcHV8V
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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