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51 - 60 of 82 results for: CSI::education ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 346: Research Seminar in Higher Education

Major issues, current structural features of the system, the historical context that shaped it, and theoretical frameworks. The purposes of higher education in light of interest groups including students, faculty, administrators, and external constituents. Issues such as diversity, stratification, decentralization, and changes that cut across these groups.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 347: The Economics of Higher Education

(Same as GSBGEN 348) Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

EDUC 354: School-Based Decision Making

Leadership and organizational issues. Leadership as it plays out in the pragmatic demands and tensions of site-level decision processes. Interdependence and complexity of several factors critical to school achievement and equity outcomes: governance, culture, instruction, resource alignment, inquiry, community engagement. School decision-making as a capacity-building process.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Hoagland, G. (PI)

EDUC 355: Higher Education and Society

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 357: Science and Environmental Education in Informal Contexts

There are ever-expanding opportunities to learn science in contexts outside the formal classroom, in settings such as zoos, museums, and science centers. How are issues around science and the environment presented in these contexts, how do people behave and learn in these contexts, and what messages do they take away? This course will cover the learning theories and empirical research that has been conducted in these settings. Case studies of nearby science centers will add an experiential dimension.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

EDUC 360: Child Development in Contexts of Risk and Adversity

In this course students will learn about theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to developmental psychopathology and resilience of children and adolescents. The course focuses on (1) current conceptual and empirical issues; (2) cognitive, affective, and motivational processes that underlie some of the most salient childhood mental health symptoms and disorders; (3) family, school, and cultural factors that contribute to developmental psychopathology and resilience; and (4) cutting-edge analytic methods that are currently employed in studies of developmental psychopathology and resilience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

EDUC 366: Learning in Formal and Informal Environments

How learning opportunities are organized in schools and non-school settings including museums, after-school clubs, community art centers, theater groups, aquariums, sports teams, and new media contexts. Sociocultural theories of development as a conceptual framework. Readings from empirical journals, web publications, and books.Collaborative written or multimedia research project in which students observe and document a non-school learning environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Barron, B. (PI)

EDUC 376: Higher Education Leadership Colloquium

This course presents a series of speakers from Stanford and other higher education institutions who work at the middle to higher levels of administration. Speakers and topics are guided by student interest, but include a range from student affairs to finance. Sessions are intended to be interactive.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 377B: Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

(Same as STRAMGT 368). This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Meehan, B. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $358 billion in the year 2014. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social value creation. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, impact investing and venture philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grantmaking, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will also provide students with real-world grantmaking experience in completing nonprofit organizational assessments and making grants to organizations totaling $20,000.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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