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1 - 10 of 315 results for: CSI::certificate ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP
Instructors: Artiles, A. (PI)

AMSTUD 123X: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: Democracy Under Siege? (POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

This course both looks at the ways American political institutions shape policy outcomes and how Federal, state and local government have handled challenges related to increasing party polarization, climate change, heightened racial tensions and rising economic inequality. Instruction will include lectures, guest speakers, and moderated discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

AMSTUD 165: History of Higher Education in the U.S. (EDUC 165, EDUC 265, HISTORY 158C)

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Exhibiting the African Imaginary (AFRICAST 134, AFRICAST 234, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)

Museums are dynamic spaces with the potential to reinvent, rehabilitate, and recenter marginalized people and collections. This year, our seminar examines and enacts museum stewardship of material cultures of diverse African communities across space, time, and context. Legacies of colonialism inspire debates on restitution, reparation, and reconciliation, alongside actions to 'decolonize' museum practice. In engaging the politics of representation and human-object relationships, our class will challenge problematic imaginaries of Africa and recenter the complexities of cultures in the Horn of Africa spanning Ethiopia, Nubian Egypt, and Sudan. Students will acquire skills in researching, curating, and installing an exhibition based on Stanford's African archeological and ethnographic materials held at the Stanford University Archeology Collections (SUAC). This course will culminate in a student-curated exhibition that opens on Friday May 27, 2022 at the Stanford Archeology Center (Bldg more »
Museums are dynamic spaces with the potential to reinvent, rehabilitate, and recenter marginalized people and collections. This year, our seminar examines and enacts museum stewardship of material cultures of diverse African communities across space, time, and context. Legacies of colonialism inspire debates on restitution, reparation, and reconciliation, alongside actions to 'decolonize' museum practice. In engaging the politics of representation and human-object relationships, our class will challenge problematic imaginaries of Africa and recenter the complexities of cultures in the Horn of Africa spanning Ethiopia, Nubian Egypt, and Sudan. Students will acquire skills in researching, curating, and installing an exhibition based on Stanford's African archeological and ethnographic materials held at the Stanford University Archeology Collections (SUAC). This course will culminate in a student-curated exhibition that opens on Friday May 27, 2022 at the Stanford Archeology Center (Bldg 500) and is planned to feature renowned Somali-Swedish archeologist, Dr. Sada Mire, as the keynote speaker.nnBecause of limited spacing you will need to fill out this form https://forms.gle/h8F46iv5iSwiX3PY7 and receive consent to enroll in the course from the instructor. nn3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

ARTHIST 284B: Museum Cultures: Exhibiting the African Imaginary (AFRICAST 134, AFRICAST 234, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234)

Museums are dynamic spaces with the potential to reinvent, rehabilitate, and recenter marginalized people and collections. This year, our seminar examines and enacts museum stewardship of material cultures of diverse African communities across space, time, and context. Legacies of colonialism inspire debates on restitution, reparation, and reconciliation, alongside actions to 'decolonize' museum practice. In engaging the politics of representation and human-object relationships, our class will challenge problematic imaginaries of Africa and recenter the complexities of cultures in the Horn of Africa spanning Ethiopia, Nubian Egypt, and Sudan. Students will acquire skills in researching, curating, and installing an exhibition based on Stanford's African archeological and ethnographic materials held at the Stanford University Archeology Collections (SUAC). This course will culminate in a student-curated exhibition that opens on Friday May 27, 2022 at the Stanford Archeology Center (Bldg more »
Museums are dynamic spaces with the potential to reinvent, rehabilitate, and recenter marginalized people and collections. This year, our seminar examines and enacts museum stewardship of material cultures of diverse African communities across space, time, and context. Legacies of colonialism inspire debates on restitution, reparation, and reconciliation, alongside actions to 'decolonize' museum practice. In engaging the politics of representation and human-object relationships, our class will challenge problematic imaginaries of Africa and recenter the complexities of cultures in the Horn of Africa spanning Ethiopia, Nubian Egypt, and Sudan. Students will acquire skills in researching, curating, and installing an exhibition based on Stanford's African archeological and ethnographic materials held at the Stanford University Archeology Collections (SUAC). This course will culminate in a student-curated exhibition that opens on Friday May 27, 2022 at the Stanford Archeology Center (Bldg 500) and is planned to feature renowned Somali-Swedish archeologist, Dr. Sada Mire, as the keynote speaker.nnBecause of limited spacing you will need to fill out this form https://forms.gle/h8F46iv5iSwiX3PY7 and receive consent to enroll in the course from the instructor. nn3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

BIO 109A: Building Blocks for Chronic Disease (BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

Researchers have come a long way in developing therapies for chronic disease but a gap remains between current solutions and the ability to address the disease in full. This course provides an overview to the underlying biology of many of these diseases and how they may connect to each other. A "think outside of the box" approach to drug discovery is needed to bridge such a gap in solutions, and this course teaches the building blocks for that approach. Could Legoland provide the answer? This is a guest lecture series with original contributions from prominent thought leaders in academia and industry. Interaction between students and guest lecturers is expected. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 117: Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, EARTHSYS 217, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 144: Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective (BIO 234, HUMBIO 112)

Principles and application of the science of preserving biological diversity. Conceptually, this course is designed to explore the major components relevant to the conservation of biodiversity, as exemplified by the Latin American region. The conceptual frameworks and principles, however, should be generally applicable, and provide insights for all regions of the world. All students will be expected to conduct a literature research exercise leading to a written report, addressing a topic of their choosing, derived from any of the themes discussed in class. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or BIO 43 or HUMBIO 2A or BIO 81 and 84 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

BIO 234: Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective (BIO 144, HUMBIO 112)

Principles and application of the science of preserving biological diversity. Conceptually, this course is designed to explore the major components relevant to the conservation of biodiversity, as exemplified by the Latin American region. The conceptual frameworks and principles, however, should be generally applicable, and provide insights for all regions of the world. All students will be expected to conduct a literature research exercise leading to a written report, addressing a topic of their choosing, derived from any of the themes discussed in class. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or BIO 43 or HUMBIO 2A or BIO 81 and 84 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

BIOC 109A: Building Blocks for Chronic Disease (BIO 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

Researchers have come a long way in developing therapies for chronic disease but a gap remains between current solutions and the ability to address the disease in full. This course provides an overview to the underlying biology of many of these diseases and how they may connect to each other. A "think outside of the box" approach to drug discovery is needed to bridge such a gap in solutions, and this course teaches the building blocks for that approach. Could Legoland provide the answer? This is a guest lecture series with original contributions from prominent thought leaders in academia and industry. Interaction between students and guest lecturers is expected. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
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