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371 - 380 of 407 results for: CSI::certificate ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

PUBLPOL 246: What The 2018 Elections Told Us And How They Help Us See How Campaigns Can Win In 2020 (COMM 153A, COMM 253A, POLISCI 72, PUBLPOL 146)

(Same as LAW 7057). The frequency of American elections means that we¿re never that far away from the next contest. This course is situated shortly after the conclusion of the 2018 midterm elections at the very start of the invisible primary that precedes the 2020 presidential campaign. It will provide students with a behind-the-scenes understanding of how campaigns work. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to high-profile campaigns -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature prominent guest speakers who have served and will serve in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns. Our goal is to discern the lessons learned from the 2018 midterm elections, and how they will inform our understanding of what will happen in the 2020 presidential contest
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 301B: Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers (INTLPOL 204B)

This class provides economic and institutional background necessary to conduct policy analysis. We will examine the economic justification for government intervention and illustrate these concepts with applications drawn from different policy contexts. The goal of the course is to provide you with the conceptual foundations and the practical skills and experience you will need to be thoughtful consumers or producers of policy analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102B or PUBLPOL 303D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 307: Justice (ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, POLISCI 103, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C)

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 103.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 308: Political Analysis for Public Policymakers

Policymakers in the United States, whether elected or unelected, operate in a governmental system where politics pervades nearly every element of their daily activity. This course provides students with both the theory and real-world examples they need to understand and evaluate the impact of politics, political institutions, and the political process on policymaking. Readings will include selections from the public policy, political science, legal, and economics literatures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 309: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 311: Public Policy Colloquium

Weekly colloquia speaker series required for M.P.P. and M.A. in Public Policy students. Themes vary each quarter. Open only to Public Policy graduate students; permission number required to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

REES 304G: War and Society (HISTORY 204G, HISTORY 304G)

How Western societies and cultures have responded to modern warfare. The relationship between its destructive capacity and effects on those who produce, are subject to, and must come to terms with its aftermath. Literary representations of WW I; destructive psychological effects of modern warfare including those who take pleasure in killing; changes in relations between the genders; consequences of genocidal ideology and racial prejudice; the theory of just war and its practical implementation; and how wars are commemorated.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

SOC 130: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)

SOC 135: Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States (SOC 235)

Over the last three decades, inequality in America has increased substantially. Why has this happened, and what can be done about it? The course will begin by surveying the basic features of poverty, inequality, and economic mobility in the 21st century. From here we will discuss issues related to discrimination, education and schools, criminal justice, and the changing nature of the family as forces that shape inequality. We will also focus on the main social policy options for addressing inequality in the United States, including income support for the poor, taxing higher incomes, efforts to encourage philanthropy, and other institutional reforms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: King, M. (PI)

SOC 231: World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 136, EDUC 306D)

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)
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