2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

211 - 220 of 407 results for: CSI::certificate ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENGR 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (EDUC 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENVRES 225: E-IPER Current Topics Seminar

For E-IPER Ph.D and Joint M.S. students only. Weekly presentations of E-IPER students' research and other program-related projects. Occasional guest speakers. Individual or team presentation, active participation, and regular attendance required for credit. May be taken for credit a maximum of two times. Enrollment by department consent only. Contact instructor for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barsom, S. (PI)

ENVRES 280: Topics in Environment and Resources

Required core course restricted to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. This course functions as a gateway to fundamental concepts in environment, energy and sustainability. Topics include climate change, ecosystem services, life cycle assessment, energy systems, food systems, and others. Students engage with affiliated faculty, and begin to develop ways to integrate science and technology with business, law and other professional skills to solve environment and resource problems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENVRES 290: Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources

Required for and limited to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. Propose, conduct and publicly present final individual or team projects demonstrating the integration of professional (M.B.A., J.D., or M.D.) and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees. Presentation and submission of final product required. 3 total units required; can all be taken during one quarter or divided over two sequential quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENVRES 380: Innovating Large Scale Sustainable Transformations (SUST 230)

This class establishes innovation of systemic transformations as a crucial leadership modality. It gives students the mindsets, theoretical framework, and hands-on experience in shaping innovative interventions that bring about scaled and profound transformations in the face of complex multi-factorial challenges. Students are immersed in the Deep Change Methodology, which combines systems thinking, strategy, design thinking, behavioral sciences, resilience theory, diffusion theory, decision theory, and a theoretical framework around scaled multistake-holder interventions. Tools and theories introduced in class will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create sustainability and resilience on environmental, societal, and economic fronts. This project-based team-based class challenges students to find solutions for complex real world challenges. Consent of instructor required. Class meets Fridays 9:30am-4:20pm, weeks 2-9. Lunch is provided. Final presentations on Friday of week 9, 3-7:30pm.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 106: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 106, EARTHSYS 206, ECON 106, ECON 206, ESS 206)

The economics of food production, consumption, and trade. The micro- and macro- determinants of food supply and demand, including the interrelationship among food, income, population, and public-sector decision making. Emphasis on the role of agriculture in poverty alleviation, economic development, and environmental outcomes. Grades based on mid-term exam and group modeling project and presentation. Enrollment is by application only and will be capped at 25, with priority given to upper level undergraduates in Economics and Earth Systems and graduate students (graduate students enroll in 206). Applications for enrollment are due by December 7, 2018. The application can be found here: https://economics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/forms
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 111: Biology and Global Change (BIO 117, EARTHSYS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 206: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 106, EARTHSYS 206, ECON 106, ECON 206, ESS 106)

The economics of food production, consumption, and trade. The micro- and macro- determinants of food supply and demand, including the interrelationship among food, income, population, and public-sector decision making. Emphasis on the role of agriculture in poverty alleviation, economic development, and environmental outcomes. Grades based on mid-term exam and group modeling project and presentation. Enrollment is by application only and will be capped at 25, with priority given to upper level undergraduates in Economics and Earth Systems and graduate students (graduate students enroll in 206). Applications for enrollment are due by December 7, 2018. The application can be found here: https://economics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/forms
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 270: Analyzing land use in a globalized world (ESS 170)

This course examines the dynamics of land use in relation to globalization. The objective is to understand how the expansion of global trade, and public and private regulations affect land use changes. The course will enable students to better understand how to effectively influence land use change, from different vantage points (government, NGO, corporate actor¿). The main emphasis is on tropical regions. Lectures introduce theories, practical cases, and evaluation tools to better understand contemporary land use dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lambin, E. (PI)

ESS 280: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (EARTHSYS 180)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing. Application required. Deadline: September 12 for Autumn. nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6Md7jndlBIcHV8V
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints