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241 - 250 of 350 results for: CSI::certificate

LAW 7010: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention paid to equal protection and substantive due process. We will examine many contested constitutional questions, including, for example: How did gay and lesbian relationships go so quickly from being subject to criminal prohibition to being eligible for marriage? What justifies the Supreme Court's striking down a law mandating segregated schools, when it had upheld an analogous law half a century earlier? Must the law treat all individuals identically, or may and should it grant special protections to members of historically disadvantaged groups? To what sources might (and should) a judge look to give content to vague constitutional terms like "equal protection" and "due process"? How can we distinguish "law" from "politics" in this area? Readings will include judicial opinions and some scholarly commentary. Class discussion will be supplemented with group exercises of various sorts. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Schacter, J. (PI)

MATSCI 156: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 145 and 152 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics and electronic properties.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

MATSCI 302: Solar Cells

In the last 15 years, the solar power market has grown in size by 100 times while solar modules prices have fallen by 20 times. Unsubsidized, solar power projects now compete favorably against fossil fuels in many countries and is on track to be the largest energy provider in the future. How did this happen? nnIn MatSci 302 we will take a comprehensive look at solar cells starting from the underlying device physics that are relevant to all photovoltaic cell technologies. We will then look at the undisputed king (silicon based solar cells); how do they work today and how will they develop in the future. Finally, we will look at why past challengers have failed and how future challengers can succeed. This class will be co-taught by Brian and Craig, who graduated from the Material Science PhD program in 2011 and then started PLANT PV, a startup that developed a solar technology from idea to protoype and then full implementation on production lines in China. The lecturers routinely visit manufacturing facilities in Asia and work closely with engineering staff at the largest solar cell makers in the world to implement their technology into production lines.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 206B: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ME 243: Designing Emotion- for Reactive Car Interfaces

Students learn to define emotions as physiology, expression, and private experience using the automobile and shared space. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and user car experience. Reflective, narrative, and socio-cognitive techniques serve to make sense of mobility experiences; replay memories; examine engagement; understand user interviews. This course celebrates car fascination and leads the student through finding and telling the car experience through discussion, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and in car experiences. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology, design thinking, and fine art, and are applied to the car or mobility experience. Course culminates in a final individual narrative presentation and group project demonstration. Class size limited to 18.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 302B: The Future of the Automobile- Driver Assistance and Automated Driving

This course provides a holistic overview over the field of vehicle automation. The course starts with the history of vehicle automation and then introduces key terminology and taxonomy. Guest lecturers present the legal and policy aspects of vehicle automation both on the federal and state level. Then, the state of the art in vehicle automation is provided. This includes sensor and actuator technology as well as the driver assistance technology in cars today. Finally, the technology currently being developed for future highly and fully automated vehicles is described, including a high-level introduction of the software and algorithms used as well as HMI and system aspects. Students are asking to work in groups on a current topic related to vehicle automation and present their findings in the final two classes in a short presentation.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ME 302C: The Future of the Automobile- Mobility Entrepreneurship

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding for the requirements that go into the design of a highly complex yet easy-to-use product, i.e. the automobile. Students will learn about very different interdisciplinary aspects that characterize the automobile and personal mobility. This is part of a multi-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, students will learn from 10 different founders / C-level executives about how they built their mobility startup to change the world of transportation. Previous classes included speakers from Tesla, Lyft, Pearl Auto, Turo, Nauto. In hearing these founder stories, students will get an insight not only into the world of entrepreneurship but also the multidisciplinary nature of the transportation industry. The course consists of 50-minute discussions with founders, with students encouraged to participate and ask questions of the founders. To obtain credit, students must attend 8 out of 10 classes including the first class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ME 368A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and int more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 368B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and int more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
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