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71 - 80 of 354 results for: CSI::certificate

CEE 323C: Infrastructure Finance and Governance

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHEM 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHEMENG 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHPR 130: Human Nutrition (HUMBIO 130)

The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Gardner, C. (PI)

COMM 162: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 262, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

COMM 262: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 162, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

COMM 308: Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology

For students interested in research in political science, psychology, or communication. Methodological techniques for studying political attitudes and behaviors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

CS 402: Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools (EDUC 236)

This course is a practicum in the design of technology-enabled curricula and hands-on learning environments. It focuses on the theories, concepts, and practices necessary to design effective, low-cost educational technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. We will explore theories and design frameworks from constructivist and constructionist learning perspectives, as well as the lenses of critical pedagogy, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and interaction design for children. The course will concretize theories, concepts, and practices in weekly presentations (including examples) from industry experts with significant backgrounds and proven expertise in designing successful, evidence-based, educational technology products. The Practicum provides the design foundation for EDUC 211 / CS 402 L, a hands-on lab focused on introductory prototyping and the fabrication of incipient interactive, educational technologies. (No prior prototyping experience required.) Interested students must also register for either EDUC 211 or CS 402L, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CS 402L: Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab (EDUC 211)

This lab course is a hands-on introduction to the prototyping and fabrication of tangible, interactive technologies, with a special focus on learning and education. (No prior prototyping experience required.) It focuses on the design and prototyping of low-cost technologies that support learning in all contexts for a variety of diverse learners. You will be introduced to, and learn how to use state-of-the-art fabrication machines (3D printers, laser cutters, Go Go Boards, Sensors, etc.) to design educational toolkits, educational toys, science kits, and tangible user interfaces. The lab builds on the the theoretical and evidence-based foundations explored in the EDUC 236 / CS 402 Practicum. Interested students must also register for either EDUC 236 or CS 402, complete the application at http://bit.ly/educ236 by January 4 at 5 p.m., and come to the first class at 8:30 a.m. in CERAS 108.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3

CSB 240B: A Practical Approach to Drug Discover and Development

(Continuation of 240A) Advancing a drug from discovery of a therapeutic target to human trials and commercialization. Topics include: high throughput assay development, compound screening, lead optimization, protecting intellectual property, toxicology testing, regulatory issues, assessment of clinical need, defining the market, conducting clinical trials, project management, and commercialization issues, including approach to licensing and raising capital. Maximum units are available by taking an additional contact hour. Prerequisite: 240A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
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