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161 - 170 of 354 results for: CSI::certificate

EDUC 417: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 117)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 421: Powerful Ideas for Learning Sciences and Technology Design: Sociocultural Practices of the Blues

This course is intended as a graduate level seminar that provides in-depth readings and discussions, Professor Roy Pea's professional reflections, and student essay-writing on topics examined in Dr. Pea's select publications and associated influential writings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Pea, R. (PI)

EDUC 445: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

(Same as STRAMGT 335) In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Lee, G. (PI)

EE 292H: Engineering, Entrepreneurship & Climate Change

The purpose of this seminar series course is to help students and professionals develop the tools to apply the engineering and entrepreneurial mindset to problems that stem from climate change, in order to consider and evaluate possible stabilizing, remedial and adaptive approaches. This course is not a crash course on climate change or policy. Instead we will focus on learning about and discussing the climate problems that seem most tractable to these approaches. Each week Dr. Field and/or a guest speaker will lead a short warm-up discussion/activity and then deliver a talk in his/her area of expertise. We will wrap up with small-group and full-class discussions of related challenges/opportunities and possible engineering-oriented solutions. Class members are asked to do background reading before each class, to submit a question before each lecture, and to do in-class brainstorming. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Field, L. (PI)

EE 292T: SmartGrids and Advanced Power Systems Seminar (CEE 272T)

A series of seminar and lectures focused on power engineering. Renowned researchers from universities and national labs will deliver bi-weekly seminars on the state of the art of power system engineering. Seminar topics may include: power system analysis and simulation, control and stability, new market mechanisms, computation challenges and solutions, detection and estimation, and the role of communications in the grid. The instructors will cover relevant background materials in the in-between weeks. The seminars are planned to continue throughout the next academic year, so the course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

EE 293B: Fundamentals of Energy Processes (ENERGY 293B)

For seniors and graduate students. Covers scientific and engineering fundamentals of renewable energy processes involving heat. Thermodynamics, heat engines, solar thermal, geothermal, biomass. Recommended: MATH 19-21; PHYSICS 41, 43, 45
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EMED 255: Design for Health: Helping Patients Navigate the System (DESINST 255)

For many people, participating in the American healthcare system is confusing, frustrating and often disempowering. It is also an experience fueled with emotional intensity and feelings of vulnerability. The current ecosystem, with its complexity and multiple stakeholders, is rife with human-centered design opportunities. An especially sticky set of issues lies in the ways people navigate healthcare: understanding how the system works, accessing information about services, making decisions about treatment and interventions, and advocating for needs.nAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

ENERGY 101: Energy and the Environment (EARTHSYS 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ENERGY 101A: Energizing California

A weekend field trip featuring renewable and nonrenewable energy installations in Northern California. Tour geothermal, bioenergy, and natural gas field sites with expert guides from the Department of Energy Resources Engineering. Requirements: One campus meeting and weekend field trip. Enrollment limited to 25. Freshman have first choice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Onori, S. (PI)

ENERGY 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (EARTHSYS 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
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