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91 - 100 of 513 results for: CSI::certificate

CHEMENG 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHPR 130: Human Nutrition (HUMBIO 130)

The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gardner, C. (PI)

CHPR 166: Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context (HUMBIO 166)

The material in this course is an introduction to the field and the target audience is undergraduates. It may be of interest to graduate students unfamiliar with the field. The class examines the array of forces that affect the foods human beings eat, and when, where, and how we eat them, including human labor, agriculture, environmental sustainability, politics, animal rights/welfare, ethics, policy, culture, economics, business, law, trade, and ideology, and psychology. The class addresses the impact of current policies and actions that might be taken to improve human nutrition and health; macro-scale influences on food, nutrition, and eating behavior. . Undergraduate Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHPR 223: Obesity in America: Clinical and Public Health Implications (HUMBIO 123)

Interdisciplinary clinical, research, and policy approaches. The prevalence, predictors, and consequences of obesity and diabetes; biological and physiological mechanisms; clinical treatments including medications and surgery; and the relevance of behavioral, environmental, economic, and policy approaches to obesity prevention and control. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 123. CHPR Master's students who are not medical students enroll in CHPR 223 for a letter grade. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Rosas, L. (PI)

COMM 113: Computational Methods in the Civic Sphere (COMM 213)

The widespread availability of public data provides a rich opportunity for those who can efficiently filter, interpret, and visualize information. Course develops necessary technical skills for data collection, analysis, and publication, including data mining and web visualization, with a focus on civic affairs and government accountability. Open to all majors and a range of technical skill levels. Involves tackling new tools and technical concepts in the pursuit of engaging, public-facing projects. (Graduate students enroll in 213). Prerequisite COMM 273D, CS 106A, or CS 106B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nguyen, D. (PI)

COMM 162: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 262, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Iyengar, S. (PI)

COMM 213: Computational Methods in the Civic Sphere (COMM 113)

The widespread availability of public data provides a rich opportunity for those who can efficiently filter, interpret, and visualize information. Course develops necessary technical skills for data collection, analysis, and publication, including data mining and web visualization, with a focus on civic affairs and government accountability. Open to all majors and a range of technical skill levels. Involves tackling new tools and technical concepts in the pursuit of engaging, public-facing projects. (Graduate students enroll in 213). Prerequisite COMM 273D, CS 106A, or CS 106B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nguyen, D. (PI)

COMM 262: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 162, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Iyengar, S. (PI)

COMM 308: Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology (POLISCI 324)

For students interested in research in political science, psychology, or communication. Methodological techniques for studying political attitudes and behaviors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

CS 203: Cybersecurity: A Legal and Technical Perspective

This class will use the case method to teach basic computer, network, and information security from a technology, law, policy, and business perspective. Using recent security incidents from the news, we will discuss the technical aspects of the incident, the legal and policy aspects of the problem, and business approaches to managing breaches. The case studies will be organized around the following topics: tracking political dissidents, state sponsored sabotage, corporate and government espionage, credit card theft, theft of embarrassing personal data, phishing and social engineering attacks, denial of service attacks, attacks on weak session management and URLs, cloud data storage as a security risk, wiretapping on the Internet, and digital forensics.nStudents taking the class will learn about the techniques attackers use, applicable legal prohibitions, rights, and remedies, and approaches to managing the risk and aftermath of an attack. Grades will be based on class participation (25%) and on a student term paper explaining the technical and legal concepts relevant to a recent cybersecurity breach of the student's choice, with instructor approval (75%). The class will be co-taught by Stanford Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering and co-director of the Stanford Computer Security Lab Dan Boneh and Director of Civil Liberties at the Law School's Center for Internet and Society Jennifer Granick. Special Instructions: This class is limited to 80 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (40 students will be selected by lottery) and students from Computer Science (40 students). Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Computer Science (Same as Law 4004).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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