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361 - 370 of 513 results for: CSI::certificate

ME 206B: Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability

Part two of two-quarter project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Second quarter emphasizes prototyping and implementation of specific projects identified in first quarter. Students work in cross-disciplinary project teams. Industry and adviser interaction, weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Prerequisite: 206A.n(Jointly offered as GSB OIT333B) Design Institute class; see http://dschool.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 243: Designing Emotion-Reactive Car Interfaces

How to design in car interfaces that take into account the emotional state of the driver in the moment of driving? Participants will be prototyping and testing interfaces for an industry partner. The challenge is to take real time responsive data to infer the emotional state of a driver and to lever these to improve the driving experience. We will cover topics on design methodology, psychology of emotions, and human machine interaction to reflect and work on the emotionally charged car experience of today to imagine the car of tomorrow. Class meetings will include: prototyping, discussions and presentations. Participants will have access to tools, prototyping materials, and a car. Students from all ENG majors but also beyond are encouraged to join. Bring your drivers license, if you have one. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 302A: Introduction to Automotive and Transportation Innovation at Stanford

The objective of this course is to survey the innovative automotive and transportation community within Stanford. Stanford University has become one of the best universities on earth to to change the future of transportation and this course is a 'who's who' of that world. This is the first part of a 3-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, the seminar will feature talks from Stanford experts in focus areas as varied as autonomous vehicles, entrepreneurship, design, ethics, aerodynamics, neuroscience, communications and security. At the end of the quarter, students will have developed an understanding of Stanford's portfolio of transportation work and know the specific individuals who are key to its future. To obtain credit, students must attend the first class (no exceptions) plus 7 additional classes for a total of 8 classes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Zoepf, S. (PI)

ME 302B: The Future of the Automobile- Driver Assistance and Automated Driving

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding for the requirements that go into the design of a highly complex yet easy-to-use product, i.e. the automobile. Students will learn about very different interdisciplinary aspects that characterize the automobile and personal mobility. This is the second part of a 3-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, the seminar will discuss how various vehicle systems help drivers to maneuver their vehicles through traffic. Advanced driver assistance systems range from navigation, adaptive cruise control, night vision, and lane departure warning to automated parking, traffic jam assistance, and eventually self-driving cars. These systems play an important role in making traffic safer, more efficient, and more enjoyable. This course, lectured by an industry expert, will introduce students to the technology behind the systems, the benefits, challenges, and future perspectives of this exciting field. Students will develop an understanding for the interactions of the technology, business, and society with a specific automotive focus.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 302C: The Future of the Automobile- Mobility Entrepreneurship

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding for the requirements that go into the design of a highly complex yet easy-to-use product, i.e. the automobile. Students will learn about very different interdisciplinary aspects that characterize the automobile and personal mobility. This is the third part of a 3-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, students will learn from 9 different founders / C-level executives about how they built their mobility startup to change the world of transportation. Founders from Varden Labs, Lyft, Pearl Auto, Turo and more will be featured. In hearing these founder stories, students will get an insight not only into the world of entrepreneurship but also the multidisciplinary nature of the transportation industry. The course consists of 50-minute discussions with founders, with students encouraged to participate and ask questions of the founders. To obtain credit, students must attend 7 out of 9 classes including the first class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 368A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ME 368B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and intera more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 158A: From Foodies to Freegans: Food Popular Topics in the Silicon Valley

This is a discussion-based survey course to introduce the complexities of many "pop topics" in food, such as obesity, sustainability, and local vs. organic food. Course offered over two quarters; second part is MED 158B. The course focuses on Silicon Valley and is taught through a food justice lens. The goal is to provide knowledge and new frameworks for conceptualizing food that transform the way students think about, eat, and purchase food. Furthermore, course content is aligned with Community Engaged Learning (CEL) so that students have the opportunity to collaborate with local partners to complete community-based projects relevant to course topics. Coursework involves class participation, critical reflection, and three papers written for different audiences in the food space.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 200: Primary Care Presentations

This course is a lecture series offered during the winter quarter. The aim of this seminar is to allow medical students to experience the mindset of primary care physicians in real time. Classes feature presentations of patient cases submitted by Stanford faculty. Faculty presenters are provided with the diagnostic information for the cases in a sequential manner during and not in advance of each class, allowing students to learn from the thought process of physicians in real time as they put together the differential diagnosis, interpret diagnostic information, deliberate treatment and management options, and discuss other thoughts about the cases.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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