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81 - 90 of 308 results for: CSI::certificate

EASTASN 262: Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present (EASTASN 162)

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

ECON 118: Development Economics

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: ECON 50, ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Morten, M. (PI)

ECON 125: Economic Development, Microfinance, and Social Networks

An introduction to the study of the financial lives of households in less developed countries, focusing on savings, credit, informal insurance, the expansion of microfinance, social learning, public finance/redistribution, and social networks. Prerequisites- Econ 51 or Publpol 51 and Econ 102B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

ECON 127: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (MED 262)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Miller, G. (PI)

ECON 155: Environmental Economics and Policy

Economic sources of environmental problems and alternative policies for dealing with them (technology standards, emissions taxes, and marketable pollution permits). Evaluation of policies addressing local air pollution, global climate change, and the use of renewable resources. Connections between population growth, economic output, environmental quality, sustainable development, and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 50. May be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Goulder, L. (PI)

ECON 162: Games Developing Nations Play (POLISCI 247A, POLISCI 347A)

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Weingast, B. (PI)

ECON 165: International Finance

We will explore models for analyzing a wide variety of issues in open-economy macroeconomics, such as the balance of payments; the determination of exchange rates; monetary and fiscal policy under flexible and fixed exchange rate regimes; exchange rate crises; sovereign debt crises and the possibility of contagion. Our theoretical framework will structure our examination of important historical episodes and contemporary policy debates; the textbook will be supplemented with readings from recent scholarly articles and mainstream news sources. Active class participation is an important part of the course. Prerequisite: ECON 52.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Bocola, L. (PI)

ECON 214: Development Economics I

This course uses microeconomic theory and empirical analyses to understand barriers to human and economic development in lower income countries, as well as how public policies are formulated and their effectiveness at alleviating poverty. Topics include institutions and governance; human capital accumulation; productivity; inequality; poverty traps. Prerequisites: 202 or 202N, 270.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Dupas, P. (PI)

ECON 226: U.S. Economic History

The role of economic history as a distinctive approach to the study of economics, using illustrations from U.S. history. Topics include: historical and institutional foundations of the U.S. rise to world economic preeminence; economic causes and consequences of slavery; the American national system of technology; the Great Depression of the 1930s and the policy response; inequality and intergenerational mobility; the growth of social insurance. Intended for graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5

ECON 241: Public Economics I

Design of tax systems, transfers intended to alleviate poverty, the effect of taxes on earnings, fees intended to internalize externalities like pollution, school finance and other forms of fiscal federalism, local public goods such as schools, policy evaluation with behavioral decision makers. Students will learn to apply sophisticated applications of frontier applied econometric techniques including synthetic controls, regression discontinuity, advanced instrumental variables methods. Prerequisites: ECON 202-204, ECON 210, ECON 270, ECON 271, or equivalent with consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
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