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1 - 10 of 18 results for: CS147

CS 147: Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design

Introduces fundamental methods and principles for designing, implementing, and evaluating user interfaces. Topics: user-centered design, rapid prototyping, experimentation, direct manipulation, cognitive principles, visual design, social software, software tools. Learn by doing: work with a team on a quarter-long design project, supported by lectures, readings, and studios. Prerequisite: 106B or X or equivalent programming experience. Recommended that CS Majors have also taken one of 142, 193P, or 193A.nnPlease note: Less than 5 is only allowed for graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

CS 147L: Cross-platform Mobile App Development

The fundamentals of cross-platform mobile application development with a focus on the React Native framework (RN). Primary focus on developing best practices in creating apps for both iOS and Android by using Javascript and existing web + mobile development paradigms. Students will explore the unique aspects that made RN a primary tool for mobile development within Facebook, Instagram, Airbnb, Walmart, Tesla, and UberEats. Skills developed over the course will be consolidated by the completion of a final project. Required Prerequisites: CS106B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 187: Design for Advocacy

The COVID pandemic has both revealed many of our underlying civilization problems and unleashed a desire for radical change. Effective responses will require people who know how to collaborate creatively and confidently, and act in systems with self-awareness. In this project based course, we will embrace complexity without being paralyzed by it. Working on a real-world challenge related to social health and civic fabric (e.g. political polarization, loneliness and social isolation) you will practice identifying high-leverage entry points for change, rigorously framing problems, and making process and product development decisions by evaluating impact. The course draws from HCD, systems thinking, strategic foresight, emotional intelligence, and agile team operations to prepare you to be even more successful as a designer, researcher, product manager, entrepreneur, or activist. If you tend to be more theory oriented, this course will get you into action. If you're quick to action, this course will give you a wider foundation for making a positive impact. Prerequisite: Strongly recommend CS147, ME216A or a d.school class on needfinding.

CS 247A: Design for Artificial Intelligence (SYMSYS 195A)

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; you must plan on attending every studio to take this class. The focus of CS247A is design for human-centered artificial intelligence experiences. What does it mean to design for AI? What is HAI? How do you create responsible, ethical, human centered experiences? Let us explore what AI actually is and the constraints, opportunities and specialized processes necessary to create AI systems that work effectively for the humans involved. Prerequisites: CS147 or equivalent background in design thinking. In the event of a waitlist, acceptance to class based on an application provided on the first day of class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CS 247B: Design for Behavior Change (SYMSYS 195B)

Over the last decade, tech companies have invested in shaping user behavior, sometimes for altruistic reasons like helping people change bad habits into good ones, and sometimes for financial reasons such as increasing engagement. In this project-based hands-on course, students explore the design of systems, information and interface for human use. We will model the flow of interactions, data and context, and crafting a design that is useful, appropriate and robust. Students will design and prototype utility apps or games as a response to the challenges presented. We will also examine the ethical consequences of design decisions and explore current issues arising from unintended consequences. Prerequisite: CS147 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CS 247G: Design for Play (SYMSYS 195G)

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; please plan on attending every studio to take this class. The focus of CS247g is an introduction to theory and practice of game design. We will make digital and paper games, do rapid iteration and run user research studies appropriate to game design. This class has multiple short projects, allowing us to cover a variety of genres, from narrative to pure strategy. Prerequisites: 147 or equivalent background.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-4

CS 247S: Service Design (SYMSYS 195S)

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; you must plan on attending every studio to take this class. The focus of CS247S is Service Design. In this course we will be looking at experiences that address the needs of multiple types of stakeholders at different touchpoints - digital, physical, and everything in between. If you have ever taken an Uber, participated in the Draw, engaged with your bank, or ordered a coffee through the Starbucks app, you have experienced a service that must have a coordinated experience for the customer, the service provider, and any other stakeholders involved. Let us explore what specialized tools and processes are required to created these multi-faceted interactions. Prerequisites: CS147 or equivalent background in design thinking. In the event of a waitlist, acceptance to class based on an application provided on the first day of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CS 347: Human-Computer Interaction: Foundations and Frontiers

(Previously numbered CS376.) How will the future of human-computer interaction evolve? This course equips students with the major animating theories of human-computer interaction, and connects those theories to modern innovations in research. Major theories are drawn from interaction (e.g., tangible and ubiquitous computing), social computing (e.g., Johansen matrix), and design (e.g., reflective practitioner, wicked problems), and span domains such as AI+HCI (e.g., mixed initiative interaction), accessibility (e.g., ability based design), and interface software tools (e.g., threshold/ceiling diagrams). Students read and comment on multiple research papers per week, and perform a quarter-long research project. Prerequisites: For CS and Symbolic Systems undergraduates/masters students, CS147 or CS247. No prerequisite for PhD students or students outside of CS and Symbolic Systems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit

CS 377G: Designing Serious Games

Over the last few years we have seen the rise of "serious games" to promote understanding of complex social and ecological challenges, and to create passion for solving them. This project-based course provides an introduction to game design principals while applying them to games that teach. Run as a hands-on studio class, students will design and prototype games for social change and civic engagement. We will learn the fundamentals of games design via lecture and extensive reading in order to make effective games to explore issues facing society today. The course culminates in an end-of- quarter open house to showcase our games. Prerequisite: CS147 or equivalent. 247G recommended, but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CS 377Q: Designing for Accessibility (ME 214)

Designing for accessibility is a valuable and important skill in the UX community. As businesses are becomeing more aware of the needs and scope of people with some form of disability, the benefits of universal design, where designing for accessibility ends up benefiting everyone, are becoming more apparent. This class introduces fundamental Human Computer Interaction (HCI) concepts and skills in designing for accessibility through individual assignments. Student projects will identify an accessibility need, prototype a design solution, and conduct a user study with a person with a disability. This class focuses on the accessibility of UX with computers, mobile phones, VR, and has a design class prerequisite (e.g., CS147, ME115A).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Tang, J. (PI)
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