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11 - 20 of 47 results for: CS106a

CME 151A: Interactive Data Visualization in D3

This four-week short course introduces D3, a powerful tool for creating interactive data visualizations on the web (d3js.org). The class is geared toward scientists and engineers who want to better communicate their personal projects and research through visualizations on the web. The class will cover the basics of D3: inputting data, creating scales and axes, and adding transitions and interactivity, as well as some of the most used libraries: stack, cluster and force layouts. The class will be based on short workshops and a final project. A background in programming methodology at the level of CS106A is assumed. The course will make use of Javascript, experience is recommended but not necessary.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

CME 193: Introduction to Scientific Python

This short course runs for the first four weeks of the quarter. It is recommended for students who are familiar with programming at least at the level of CS106A and want to translate their programming knowledge to Python with the goal of becoming proficient in the scientific computing and data science stack. Lectures will be interactive with a focus on real world applications of scientific computing. Technologies covered include Numpy, SciPy, Pandas, Scikit-learn, and others. Topics will be chosen from Linear Algebra, Optimization, Machine Learning, and Data Science. Prior knowledge of programming will be assumed, and some familiarity with Python is helpful, but not mandatory.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1

CME 250A: Machine Learning on Big Data

A short course presenting the application of machine learning methods to large datasets.Topics include: brief review of the common issues of machine learning, such as, memorizing/overfitting vs learning, test/train splits, feature engineering, domain knowledge, fast/simple/dumb learners vs slow/complex/smart learners; moving your model from your laptop into a production environment using Python (scikit) or R on small data (laptop sized) at first; building math clusters using the open source H2O product to tackle Big Data, and finally to some model building on terabyte sized datasets. Prereqresites: basic knowledge of statistics, matrix algebra, and unix-like operating systems; basic file and text manipulation skills with unix tools: pipes, cut, paste, grep, awk, sed, sort, zip; programming skill at the level of CME211 or CS106A.
Last offered: Spring 2016

COMM 180: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change (CS 182, ETHICSOC 182, PHIL 82, POLISCI 182, PUBLPOL 182)

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

CS 100A: Problem-solving Lab for CS106A

Additional problem solving practice for the introductory CS course CS 106A. Sections are designed to allow students to acquire a deeper understanding of CS and its applications, work collaboratively, and develop a mastery of the material. Limited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Concurrent enrollment in CS 106A required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1

CS 101: Introduction to Computing Principles

Introduces the essential ideas of computing: data representation, algorithms, programming "code", computer hardware, networking, security, and social issues. Students learn how computers work and what they can do through hands-on exercises. In particular, students will see the capabilities and weaknesses of computer systems so they are not mysterious or intimidating. Course features many small programming exercises, although no prior programming experience is assumed or required. CS101 is not a complete programming course such as CS106A. CS101 is effectively an alternative to CS105. A laptop computer is recommended for the in-class exercises.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR

CS 106A: Programming Methodology

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: program design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. Uses the Python programming language. No prior programming experience required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR

CS 106E: Exploration of Computing

A follow up class to CS106A for non-majors which will both provide practical web programming skills and cover essential computing topics including computer security and privacy. Additional topics will include digital representation of images and music, an exploration of how the Internet works, and a look at the internals of the computer. Students taking the course for 4 units will be required to carry out supplementary programming assignments in addition to the course's regular assignments. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Young, P. (PI)

CS 181: Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy

Ethical and social issues related to the development and use of computer technology. Ethical theory, and social, political, and legal considerations. Scenarios in problem areas: privacy, reliability and risks of complex systems, and responsibility of professionals for applications and consequences of their work. Prerequisite: CS106A. To take this course, students need permission of instructor and may need to complete an assignment due at the first day of class. Please see https://cs181.stanford.edu for more information.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

CS 182: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change (COMM 180, ETHICSOC 182, PHIL 82, POLISCI 182, PUBLPOL 182)

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
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