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11 - 20 of 34 results for: CS106a

CS 101: Introduction to Computing Principles

Introduces the essential ideas of computing: data representation, algorithms, programming "code", computer hardware, networking, security, and social issues. Students learn how computers work and what they can do through hands-on exercises. In particular, students will see the capabilities and weaknesses of computer systems so they are not mysterious or intimidating. Course features many small programming exercises, although no prior programming experience is assumed or required. CS101 is not a complete programming course such as CS106A. CS101 is effectively an alternative to CS105. A laptop computer is recommended for the in-class exercises.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR

CS 102: Working with Data - Tools and Techniques

Aimed at non-CS undergraduate and graduate students who want to learn a variety of tools and techniques for working with data. Many of the world's biggest discoveries and decisions in science, technology, business, medicine, politics, and society as a whole, are now being made on the basis of analyzing data sets. This course provides a broad and practical introduction to working with data: data analysis techniques including databases, data mining, machine learning, and data visualization; data analysis tools including spreadsheets, Tableau, relational databases and SQL, Python, and R; introduction to network analysis and unstructured data. Tools and techniques are hands-on but at a cursory level, providing a basis for future exploration and application. Prerequisites: comfort with basic logic and mathematical concepts, along with high school AP computer science, CS106A, or other equivalent programming experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Widom, J. (PI)

CS 106A: Programming Methodology

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: program design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. Uses the Python programming language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR

CS 106E: Exploration of Computing

A follow up class to CS106A for non-majors which will both provide practical web programming skills and cover essential computing topics including computer security and privacy. Additional topics will include digital representation of images and music, an exploration of how the Internet works, and a look at the internals of the computer. Students taking the course for 4 units will be required to carry out supplementary programming assignments in addition to the course's regular assignments. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Young, P. (PI)

CS 182: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change (COMM 180, ETHICSOC 182, PHIL 82, POLISCI 182, PUBLPOL 182)

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

CS 193C: Client-Side Internet Technologies

Client-side technologies used to create web sites such as Google maps or Gmail. Includes HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, the Document Object Model (DOM), and Ajax. Prerequisite: programming experience at the level of CS106A.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Young, P. (PI)

CS 237B: Principles of Robot Autonomy II (AA 174B, AA 274B, EE 260B)

This course teaches advanced principles for endowing mobile autonomous robots with capabilities to autonomously learn new skills and to physically interact with the environment and with humans. It also provides an overview of different robot system architectures. Concepts that will be covered in the course are: Reinforcement Learning and its relationship to optimal control, contact and dynamics models for prehensile and non-prehensile robot manipulation, imitation learning and human intent inference, as well as different system architectures and their verification. Students will earn the theoretical foundations for these concepts and implementnthem on mobile manipulation platforms. In homeworks, the Robot Operating System (ROS) will be used extensively for demonstrations and hands-on activities. Prerequisites: CS106A or equivalent, CME 100 or equivalent (for linear algebra), CME 106 or equivalent (for probability theory), and AA 171/274.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CS 270: Modeling Biomedical Systems: Ontology, Terminology, Problem Solving (BIOMEDIN 210)

Methods for modeling biomedical systems and for building model-based software systems. Emphasis is on intelligent systems for decision support and Semantic Web applications. Topics: knowledge representation, controlled terminologies, ontologies, reusable problem solvers, and knowledge acquisition. Students learn about current trends in the development of advanced biomedical software systems and acquire hands-on experience with several systems and tools. Prerequisites: CS106A, basic familiarity with biology, probability, and logic.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CS 342: Building for Digital Health (MED 253)

This project-based course will provide a comprehensive overview of key requirements in the design and full-stack implementation of a digital health research application. Several pre-vetted and approved projects from the Stanford School of Medicine will be available for students to select from and build. Student teams learn about all necessary approval processes to deploy a digital health solution (data privacy clearance/I RB approval, etc.) and be guided in the development of front-end and back-end infrastructure using best practices. The final project will be the presentation and deployment of a fully approved digital health research application. CS106A, CS106B, Recommended: CS193P/A, CS142, CS47, CS110. Limited enrollment for this course. Students need to submit their application online via: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfENFanSf9TL8fvCS9RSLOQ90g_NF2_lETx3pQ8Y8BjxToR7g/viewform
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Aalami, O. (PI)

CS 377N: Introduction to the Design of Smart Products (ME 216M)

This course will focus on the technical mechatronic skills as well as the human factors and interaction design considerations required for the design of smart products and devices. Students will learn techniques for rapid prototyping of smart devices, best practices for physical interaction design, fundamentals of affordances and signifiers, and interaction across networked devices. Students will be introduced to design guidelines for integrating electrical components such as PCBs into mechanical assemblies and consider the physical form of devices, not just as enclosures but also as a central component of the smart product. Prerequisites include: CS106A and E40 highly recommended, or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Follmer, S. (PI)
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