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81 - 90 of 238 results for: CS

CS 210A: Software Project Experience with Corporate Partners

Two-quarter project course. Focus is on real-world software development. Corporate partners seed projects with loosely defined challenges from their R&D labs; students innovate to build their own compelling software solutions. Student teams are treated as start-up companies with a budget and a technical advisory board comprised of instructional staff and corporate liaisons. Teams will typically travel to the corporate headquarters of their collaborating partner, meaning some teams will travel internationally. Open loft classroom format such as found in Silicon Valley software companies. Exposure to: current practices in software engineering; techniques for stimulating innovation; significant development experience with creative freedoms; working in groups; real-world software engineering challenges; public presentation of technical work; creating written descriptions of technical work. Prerequisites: CS 109 and 110.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CS 210B: Software Project Experience with Corporate Partners

Continuation of CS210A. Focus is on real-world software development. Corporate partners seed projects with loosely defined challenges from their R&D labs; students innovate to build their own compelling software solutions. Student teams are treated as start-up companies with a budget and a technical advisory board comprised of the instructional staff and corporate liaisons. Teams will typically travel to the corporate headquarters of their collaborating partner, meaning some teams will travel internationally. Open loft classroom format such as found in Silicon Valley software companies. Exposure to: current practices in software engineering; techniques for stimulating innovation; significant development experience with creative freedoms; working in groups; real world software engineering challenges; public presentation of technical work; creating written descriptions of technical work. Prerequisites: CS 210A
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CS 213: Creating Great VR: From Ideation to Monetization

Covering everything from VR fundamentals to futurecasting to launch management, this course will expose you to best practices and guidance from VR leaders that helps positions you to build great VR experiences.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 217: Hardware Accelerators for Machine Learning

This course provides in-depth coverage of the architectural techniques used to design accelerators for training and inference in machine learning systems. This course will cover classical ML algorithms such as linear regression and support vector machines as well as DNN models such as convolutional neural nets, and recurrent neural nets. We will consider both training and inference for these models and discuss the impact of parameters such as batch size, precision, sparsity and compression on the accuracy of these models. We will cover the design of accelerators for ML model inference and training. Students will become familiar with hardware implementation techniques for using parallelism, locality, and low precision to implement the core computational kernels used in ML. To design energy-efficient accelerators, students will develop the intuition to make trade-offs between ML model parameters and hardware implementation techniques. Students will read recent research papers and complete a design project. Prerequisites: CS 149 or EE 180. CS 229 is ideal, but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 221: Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques

Artificial intelligence (AI) has had a huge impact in many areas, including medical diagnosis, speech recognition, robotics, web search, advertising, and scheduling. This course focuses on the foundational concepts that drive these applications. In short, AI is the mathematics of making good decisions given incomplete information (hence the need for probability) and limited computation (hence the need for algorithms). Specific topics include search, constraint satisfaction, game playing, Markov decision processes, graphical models, machine learning, and logic. Prerequisites: CS 103 or CS 103B/X, CS 106B or CS 106X, CS 107, and CS 109 (algorithms, probability, and programming experience).
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 223A: Introduction to Robotics (ME 320)

Robotics foundations in modeling, design, planning, and control. Class covers relevant results from geometry, kinematics, statics, dynamics, motion planning, and control, providing the basic methodologies and tools in robotics research and applications. Concepts and models are illustrated through physical robot platforms, interactive robot simulations, and video segments relevant to historical research developments or to emerging application areas in the field. Recommended: matrix algebra.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 224N: Natural Language Processing with Deep Learning (LINGUIST 284)

Methods for processing human language information and the underlying computational properties of natural languages. Focus on deep learning approaches: understanding, implementing, training, debugging, visualizing, and extending neural network models for a variety of language understanding tasks. Exploration of natural language tasks ranging from simple word level and syntactic processing to coreference, question answering, and machine translation. Examination of representative papers and systems and completion of a final project applying a complex neural network model to a large-scale NLP problem. Prerequisites: calculus and linear algebra; CS124 or CS121/221.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Manning, C. (PI)

CS 224S: Spoken Language Processing (LINGUIST 285)

Introduction to spoken language technology with an emphasis on dialogue and conversational systems. Deep learning and other methods for automatic speech recognition, speech synthesis, affect detection, dialogue management, and applications to digital assistants and spoken language understanding systems. Prerequisites: CS 124, 221, 224N, or 229.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 224U: Natural Language Understanding (LINGUIST 188, LINGUIST 288)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180, CS 124, CS 224N, CS224S, or CS221; and logical/semantics such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 224W: Analysis of Networks

Networks are a fundamental tool for modeling complex social, technological, and biological systems. Coupled with emergence of online social networks and large-scale data availability in biological sciences, this course focuses on the analysis of massive networks which provide many computational, algorithmic, and modeling challenges. This course develops computational tools that reveal how the social, technological, and natural worlds are connected, and how the study of networks sheds light on these connections. nTopics include: how information spreads through society; robustness and fragility of food webs and financial markets; algorithms for the World Wide Web; friend prediction in online social networks; identification of functional modules in biological networks; disease outbreak detection.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Leskovec, J. (PI)
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