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51 - 60 of 258 results for: CS

CS 144: Introduction to Computer Networking

Principles and practice. Structure and components of computer networks, packet switching, layered architectures. Applications: web/http, voice-over-IP, p2p file sharing and socket programming. Reliable transport: TCP/IP, reliable transfer, flow control, and congestion control. The network layer: names and addresses, routing. Local area networks: ethernet and switches. Wireless networks and network security. Prerequisite: CS 110.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 145: Data Management and Data Systems

Introduction to the use, design, and implementation of database and data-intensive systems, including data models; schema design; data storage; query processing, query optimization, and cost estimation; concurrency control, transactions, and failure recovery; distributed and parallel execution; semi-structured databases; and data system support for advanced analytics and machine learning. Prerequisites: 103 and 107 (or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 146: Introduction to Game Design and Development

This project-based course provides an introduction to game design covering topics like 2D/3D Art, Audio, User Interfaces, Production, Narrative Design, Marketing, and Publishing. Speakers from the profession will provide relevant context during a weekly seminar. Weekly assignments include in-depth materials and require students to independently create small video games. Classroom meetings will be used to foster student project discussions, and deepen understanding of material. The course culminates with students forming project teams to create a final video game. Assignments will be completed within the Unity game development engine; prior Unity experience is not required. Given class size limitations, an online survey will be distributed before class starts and students will be selected so to achieve a diverse class composition. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent programming experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 147: Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design

Introduces fundamental methods and principles for designing, implementing, and evaluating user interfaces. Topics: user-centered design, rapid prototyping, experimentation, direct manipulation, cognitive principles, visual design, social software, software tools. Learn by doing: work with a team on a quarter-long design project, supported by lectures, readings, and studios. Prerequisite: 106B or X or equivalent programming experience. Recommended that CS Majors have also taken one of 142, 193P, or 193A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CS 148: Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging

Introductory prerequisite course in the computer graphics sequence introducing students to the technical concepts behind creating synthetic computer generated images. Focuses on using OpenGL to create visual imagery, as well as an understanding of the underlying mathematical concepts including triangles, normals, interpolation, texture mapping, bump mapping, etc. Course will cover fundamental understanding of light and color, as well as how it impacts computer displays and printers. Class will discuss more thoroughly how light interacts with the environment, constructing engineering models such as the BRDF, plus various simplifications into more basic lighting and shading models. Also covers ray tracing technology for creating virtual images, while drawing parallels between ray tracers and real world cameras to illustrate various concepts. Anti-aliasing and acceleration structures are also discussed. The final class mini-project consists of building out a ray tracer to create visually more »
Introductory prerequisite course in the computer graphics sequence introducing students to the technical concepts behind creating synthetic computer generated images. Focuses on using OpenGL to create visual imagery, as well as an understanding of the underlying mathematical concepts including triangles, normals, interpolation, texture mapping, bump mapping, etc. Course will cover fundamental understanding of light and color, as well as how it impacts computer displays and printers. Class will discuss more thoroughly how light interacts with the environment, constructing engineering models such as the BRDF, plus various simplifications into more basic lighting and shading models. Also covers ray tracing technology for creating virtual images, while drawing parallels between ray tracers and real world cameras to illustrate various concepts. Anti-aliasing and acceleration structures are also discussed. The final class mini-project consists of building out a ray tracer to create visually compelling images. Starter codes and code bits will be provided to aid in development, but this class focuses on what you can do with the code as opposed to what the code itself looks like. Therefore grading is weighted toward in person "demos" of the code in action - creativity and the production of impressive visual imagery are highly encouraged. Prerequisites: CS 107, MATH 51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 149: Parallel Computing

This course is an introduction to parallelism and parallel programming. Most new computer architectures are parallel; programming these machines requires knowledge of the basic issues of and techniques for writing parallel software. Topics: varieties of parallelism in current hardware (e.g., fast networks, multicore, accelerators such as GPUs, vector instruction sets), importance of locality, implicit vs. explicit parallelism, shared vs. non-shared memory, synchronization mechanisms (locking, atomicity, transactions, barriers), and parallel programming models (threads, data parallel/streaming, MapReduce, Apache Spark, SPMD, message passing, SIMT, transactions, and nested parallelism). Significant parallel programming assignments will be given as homework. The course is open to students who have completed the introductory CS course sequence through 110.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 151: Logic Programming

Logic Programming is a style of programming based on symbolic logic. In writing a logic program, the programmer describes the application area of the program (as a set of logical sentences) without reference to the internal data structures or operations of the system executing the program. In this regard, a logic program is more of a specification than an implementation; and logic programs are often called runnable specifications. This course introduces basic logic programming theory, current technology, and examples of common applications, notably deductive databases, logical spreadsheets, enterprise management, computational law, and game playing. Work in the course takes the form of readings and exercises, weekly programming assignments, and a term-long project. Prerequisite: CS 106B or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 154: Introduction to Automata and Complexity Theory

This course provides a mathematical introduction to the following questions: What is computation? Given a computational model, what problems can we hope to solve in principle with this model? Besides those solvable in principle, what problems can we hope to efficiently solve? In many cases we can give completely rigorous answers; in other cases, these questions have become major open problems in computer science and mathematics. By the end of this course, students will be able to classify computational problems in terms of their computational complexity (Is the problem regular? Not regular? Decidable? Recognizable? Neither? Solvable in P? NP-complete? PSPACE-complete?, etc.). Students will gain a deeper appreciation for some of the fundamental issues in computing that are independent of trends of technology, such as the Church-Turing Thesis and the P versus NP problem. Prerequisites: CS 103 or 103B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 155: Computer and Network Security

For seniors and first-year graduate students. Principles of computer systems security. Attack techniques and how to defend against them. Topics include: network attacks and defenses, operating system security, application security (web, apps, databases), malware, privacy, and security for mobile devices. Course projects focus on building reliable code. Prerequisite: 110. Recommended: basic Unix.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 157: Computational Logic

Rigorous introduction to Symbolic Logic from a computational perspective. Encoding information in the form of logical sentences. Reasoning with information in this form. Overview of logic technology and its applications - in mathematics, science, engineering, business, law, and so forth. Topics include the syntax and semantics of Propositional Logic, Relational Logic, and Herbrand Logic, validity, contingency, unsatisfiability, logical equivalence, entailment, consistency, natural deduction (Fitch), mathematical induction, resolution, compactness, soundness, completeness.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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