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51 - 60 of 238 results for: CS

CS 157: Computational Logic

Rigorous introduction to Symbolic Logic from a computational perspective. Encoding information in the form of logical sentences. Reasoning with information in this form. Overview of logic technology and its applications - in mathematics, science, engineering, business, law, and so forth. Topics include the syntax and semantics of Propositional Logic, Relational Logic, and Herbrand Logic, validity, contingency, unsatisfiability, logical equivalence, entailment, consistency, natural deduction (Fitch), mathematical induction, resolution, compactness, soundness, completeness.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 161: Design and Analysis of Algorithms

Worst and average case analysis. Recurrences and asymptotics. Efficient algorithms for sorting, searching, and selection. Data structures: binary search trees, heaps, hash tables. Algorithm design techniques: divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, amortized analysis, randomization. Algorithms for fundamental graph problems: minimum-cost spanning tree, connected components, topological sort, and shortest paths. Possible additional topics: network flow, string searching. Prerequisite: 103 or 103B; 109 or STATS 116.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 166: Data Structures

Techniques in the design, analysis, and implementation of data structures. Isometries between data structures (including red/black trees and 2-3-4 trees), amortized analysis (including Fibonacci heaps and splay trees), and randomization (including count-min sketches and dynamic perfect hash tables). Data structures for integers and strings (including van Emde Boas trees and suffix trees). Possible additional topics include functional data structures, concurrent data structures, and spatial data structures. Prerequisites: CS107 and CS161.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Schwarz, K. (PI)

CS 168: The Modern Algorithmic Toolbox

This course will provide a rigorous and hands-on introduction to the central ideas and algorithms that constitute the core of the modern algorithms toolkit. Emphasis will be on understanding the high-level theoretical intuitions and principles underlying the algorithms we discuss, as well as developing a concrete understanding of when and how to implement and apply the algorithms. The course will be structured as a sequence of one-week investigations; each week will introduce one algorithmic idea, and discuss the motivation, theoretical underpinning, and practical applications of that algorithmic idea. Each topic will be accompanied by a mini-project in which students will be guided through a practical application of the ideas of the week. Topics include hashing, dimension reduction and LSH, boosting, linear programming, gradient descent, sampling and estimation, and an introduction to spectral techniques. Prerequisites: CS107 and CS161, or permission from the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Valiant, G. (PI)

CS 170: Stanford Laptop Orchestra: Composition, Coding, and Performance (MUSIC 128)

Classroom instantiation of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk) which includes public performances. An ensemble of more than 20 humans, laptops, controllers, and special speaker arrays designed to provide each computer-mediated instrument with its sonic identity and presence. Topics and activities include issues of composing for laptop orchestras, instrument design, sound synthesis, programming, and live performance. May be repeated four times for credit. Space is limited; see https://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/128 for information about the application and enrollment process. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 181: Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy

Primarily for majors entering computer-related fields. Ethical and social issues related to the development and use of computer technology. Ethical theory, and social, political, and legal considerations. Scenarios in problem areas: privacy, reliability and risks of complex systems, and responsibility of professionals for applications and consequences of their work. Prerequisite: 106B or X. To take this course, students need permission of instructor and may need to complete an assignment due at the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 181W: Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy (WIM)

Writing-intensive version of CS181. Satisfies the WIM requirement for Computer Science, Engineering Physics, STS, and Math/Comp Sci undergraduates. To take this course, students need permission of instructor and may need to complete an assignment due at the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CS 183E: Effective Leadership in High-Tech

You will undoubtedly leave Stanford with the technical skills to excel in your first few jobs. But non-technical skills are just as critical to making a difference. This seminar is taught by two industry veterans in engineering leadership and product management. In a small group setting, we will explore how you can be a great individual contributor (communicating with clarity, getting traction for your ideas, resolving conflict, and delivering your best work) and how you can transition into leadership roles (finding leadership opportunities, creating a great team culture, hiring and onboarding new team members). We will end by turning back to your career (picking your first job and negotiating your offer, managing your career changes, building a great network, and succeeding with mentors). Prerequisites: Preference given to seniors and co-terms in Computer Science and related majors. Enrollment limited and application required for admittance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 190: Software Design Studio

This course teaches the art of software design: how to decompose large complex systems into classes that can be implemented and maintained easily. Topics include the causes of complexity, modular design, techniques for creating deep classes, minimizing the complexity associated with exceptions, in-code documentation, and name selection. The class involves significant system software implementation and uses an iterative approach consisting of implementation, review, and revision. The course is taught in a studio format with in-class discussions and code reviews in addition to lectures. Apply at: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cs190
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 191: Senior Project

Restricted to Computer Science and Computer Systems Engineering students. Group or individual projects under faculty direction. Register using instructor's section number. A project can be either a significant software application or publishable research. Software application projects include substantial programming and modern user-interface technologies and are comparable in scale to shareware programs or commercial applications. Research projects may result in a paper publishable in an academic journal or presentable at a conference. Required public presentation of final application or research results. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 135 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Agrawala, M. (PI) ; Aiken, A. (PI) ; Akeley, K. (PI) ; Altman, R. (PI) ; Angst, R. (PI) ; Bailis, P. (PI) ; Baker, M. (PI) ; Barbagli, F. (PI) ; Batzoglou, S. (PI) ; Bejerano, G. (PI) ; Bernstein, M. (PI) ; Blikstein, P. (PI) ; Boneh, D. (PI) ; Borenstein, J. (PI) ; Boyd, S. (PI) ; Bradski, G. (PI) ; Brafman, R. (PI) ; Cain, J. (PI) ; Cao, P. (PI) ; Casado, M. (PI) ; Charikar, M. (PI) ; Cheriton, D. (PI) ; Cooper, S. (PI) ; Dally, B. (PI) ; De-Micheli, G. (PI) ; Dill, D. (PI) ; Dror, R. (PI) ; Dwork, C. (PI) ; Engler, D. (PI) ; Ermon, S. (PI) ; Fedkiw, R. (PI) ; Feigenbaum, E. (PI) ; Fikes, R. (PI) ; Fisher, K. (PI) ; Fogg, B. (PI) ; Fox, A. (PI) ; Garcia-Molina, H. (PI) ; Genesereth, M. (PI) ; Gill, J. (PI) ; Girod, B. (PI) ; Goel, A. (PI) ; Goel, S. (PI) ; Goodman, N. (PI) ; Guibas, L. (PI) ; Hanrahan, P. (PI) ; Heer, J. (PI) ; Hennessy, J. (PI) ; Horowitz, M. (PI) ; James, D. (PI) ; Johari, R. (PI) ; Johnson, M. (PI) ; Jurafsky, D. (PI) ; Katti, S. (PI) ; Kay, M. (PI) ; Khatib, O. (PI) ; Klemmer, S. (PI) ; Kochenderfer, M. (PI) ; Koller, D. (PI) ; Koltun, V. (PI) ; Konolige, K. (PI) ; Kozyrakis, C. (PI) ; Kundaje, A. (PI) ; Lam, M. (PI) ; Landay, J. (PI) ; Latombe, J. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Leskovec, J. (PI) ; Levis, P. (PI) ; Levitt, M. (PI) ; Levoy, M. (PI) ; Li, F. (PI) ; Liang, P. (PI) ; Manna, Z. (PI) ; Manning, C. (PI) ; Mazieres, D. (PI) ; McCarthy, J. (PI) ; McKeown, N. (PI) ; Mitchell, J. (PI) ; Mitra, S. (PI) ; Montanari, A. (PI) ; Motwani, R. (PI) ; Musen, M. (PI) ; Nass, C. (PI) ; Nayak, P. (PI) ; Ng, A. (PI) ; Niebles Duque, J. (PI) ; Nilsson, N. (PI) ; Olukotun, O. (PI) ; Ousterhout, J. (PI) ; Paepcke, A. (PI) ; Pande, V. (PI) ; Parlante, N. (PI) ; Pea, R. (PI) ; Piech, C. (PI) ; Plotkin, S. (PI) ; Plummer, R. (PI) ; Potts, C. (PI) ; Prabhakar, B. (PI) ; Pratt, V. (PI) ; Raghavan, P. (PI) ; Rajaraman, A. (PI) ; Re, C. (PI) ; Reingold, O. (PI) ; Roberts, E. (PI) ; Rosenblum, M. (PI) ; Roughgarden, T. (PI) ; Sahami, M. (PI) ; Salisbury, J. (PI) ; Savarese, S. (PI) ; Saxena, A. (PI) ; Schwarz, K. (PI) ; Shoham, Y. (PI) ; Sosic, R. (PI) ; Stepp, M. (PI) ; Thrun, S. (PI) ; Tobagi, F. (PI) ; Trevisan, L. (PI) ; Ullman, J. (PI) ; Valiant, G. (PI) ; Van Roy, B. (PI) ; Wang, G. (PI) ; Widom, J. (PI) ; Wiederhold, G. (PI) ; Williams, R. (PI) ; Williams, V. (PI) ; Winograd, T. (PI) ; Winstein, K. (PI) ; Wootters, M. (PI) ; Young, P. (PI) ; Zaharia, M. (PI) ; Zelenski, J. (PI)
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