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21 - 30 of 310 results for: CS

CS 58: You Say You Want a Revolution (Blockchain Edition)

This project-based course will give creative students an opportunity to work together on revolutionary change leveraging blockchain technology. The course will provide opportunities for students to become operationally familiar with blockchain concepts, supported by presentation of blockchain fundamentals at a level accessible to those with or without a strong technical background. Specific topics include: incentives, ethics, crypto-commons, values, FOMO 3D, risks, implications and social good. Students will each discover a new possible use-case for blockchain and prototype their vision for the future accordingly. Application and impact areas may come from medicine, law, economics, history, anthropology, or other sectors. Student diversity of background will be valued highly.
Last offered: Winter 2019

CS 58N: The Blockchain Revolution Will Not Be Televised

This seminar will explore the nature of revolutions supported and enabled by technological change, using the Internet and smart phone as two historical examples and focusing on blockchain technology and potential applications such as money, banking, supply chain and market trading. In this project-based course, one meeting per week will bring in new information, including visiting experts. Other class meetings will involve team work, presentations, and discussion. Each student will help lead a section; the class collectively will produce a final book/movie/blog, in a medium selected by the class.
Last offered: Winter 2020

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CS 81SI: AI Interpretability and Fairness

As black-box AI models grow increasingly relevant in human-centric applications, explainability and fairness becomes increasingly necessary for trust in adopting AI models. This seminar class introduces students to major problems in AI explainability and fairness, and explores key state-of-theart methods. Key technical topics include surrogate methods, feature visualization, network dissection, adversarial debiasing, and fairness metrics. There will be a survey of recent legal and policy trends. Each week a guest lecturer from AI research, industry, and related policy fields will present an open problem and solution, followed by a roundtable discussion with the class. Students have the opportunity to present a topic of interestnor application to their own projects (solo or in teams) in the final class. Code examples of each topic will be provided for students interested in a particular topic, but there will be no required coding components. Students who will benefit most from this clas more »
As black-box AI models grow increasingly relevant in human-centric applications, explainability and fairness becomes increasingly necessary for trust in adopting AI models. This seminar class introduces students to major problems in AI explainability and fairness, and explores key state-of-theart methods. Key technical topics include surrogate methods, feature visualization, network dissection, adversarial debiasing, and fairness metrics. There will be a survey of recent legal and policy trends. Each week a guest lecturer from AI research, industry, and related policy fields will present an open problem and solution, followed by a roundtable discussion with the class. Students have the opportunity to present a topic of interestnor application to their own projects (solo or in teams) in the final class. Code examples of each topic will be provided for students interested in a particular topic, but there will be no required coding components. Students who will benefit most from this class have exposure to AI, such as through projects and related coursework (e.g. statistics, CS221, CS230, CS229). Students who are pursuing subjects outside of the CS department (e.g. sciences, social sciences, humanities) with sufficient mathematical maturity are welcomed to apply. Enrollment limited to 20.
Last offered: Spring 2020

CS 82SI: Wellness in Tech: Designing an Intentional Lifestyle in a Tech-Driven World

Would deleting Facebook make us all happier? Of the 16 hours we spend awake each day on average, over 11 of those hours are spent interacting with digital media. In an always-on, tech-driven world, how do we regain control over our wellbeing?nThis 1 unit course is part workshop, part seminar, with a focus on tackling and re-framing the relationship between technology and wellness. What are the principles of human flourishing, and what is technology's role in promoting them? How can self-compassion and an appreciation for diversity lead to the development of products that enhance our collective happiness? Using human-centered design thinking, we will explore how technology both propels and hinders us- as individuals and as a society. By the end of this course, you will have tangible insights and methods to regain control over your relationship with technology. No coding involved; however we will be deeply exploring the human operating system. Students from all programs and areas of study are encouraged to apply.
Last offered: Spring 2020

CS 83: Playback Theater

Playback combines elements of theater, community work and storytelling. In a playback show, a group of actors and musicians create an improvised performance based on the audience's personal stories. A playback show brings about a powerful listening and sharing experience. During the course, we will tell, listen, play together, and train in playback techniques. We will write diaries to process our experience in the context of education and research. The course is aimed to strengthen listening abilities, creativity and the collaborative spirit, all integral parts of doing great science. In playback, as in research, we are always moving together, from the known, to the unknown, and back. There is limited enrollment for this class. Application is required.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

CS 84: Emotional Intelligence

This hands-on course is aimed at Stanford engineers who wish to be successful in start-ups or engineering-focused organizations. It is based on decades of observations by the instructors, witnessing that fresh graduates routinely struggle to survive and create an impact in the corporate world. A key objective is for students to develop a basic set of skills to master day-to-day personal interactions, and to understand the dynamics of work environments. The course then aims to guide students with more complex tasks, such as how to run effective meetings or how to work in multi-disciplinary teams. Whether you wish to become a start-up founder and CEO; a manager at a tech-centric company; or an individual contributor at Facebook or Google: if you wish to hit the ground running and be highly effective from your first day at work, this course is for you!
Last offered: Spring 2020

CS 91SI: Digital Canvas: An Introduction to UI/UX Design

Become familiar with prototype-design tools like Sketch and Marvel while also learning important design concepts in a low-stress environment. Focus is on the application of UI/UX design concepts to actual user interfaces: the creation of wireframes, high-fidelity mockups, and clickable prototypes. We will look at what makes a good or bad user interface, effective design techniques, and how to employ these techniques using Sketch and Marvel to make realistic prototypes. This course is ideal for anyone with little to no visual design experience who would like to build their skill set in UI/UX for app or web design. Also ideal for anyone with experience in front or back-end web development or human-computer interaction that would want to sharpen their visual design and analysis skills for UI/UX.
Last offered: Spring 2020

CS 93: Teaching AI

For graduate students who are TA-ing an AI course. This course prepares new AI section leaders to teach, write, and evaluate AI content. In class, you will be evaluating final projects individually and as a group. You will have discussions criticizing papers and assigning grades to them. You will analyze and solve discussion session problems on the board, explain algorithmsnlike backpropagation, and learn how to give constructive feedback to students. The class will also include a guest speaker who will give teaching advice and talk about AI. Focus is on teaching skills, techniques, and final projects grading. The class meets once a week for the first 6 weeks of the quarter.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

CS 100A: Problem-solving Lab for CS106A

Additional problem solving practice for the introductory CS course CS 106A. Sections are designed to allow students to acquire a deeper understanding of CS and its applications, work collaboratively, and develop a mastery of the material. Limited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Concurrent enrollment in CS 106A required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
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