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151 - 160 of 310 results for: CS

CS 246: Mining Massive Data Sets

The availability of massive datasets is revolutionizing science and industry. This course discusses data mining and machine learning algorithms for analyzing very large amounts of data. Topics include: Big data systems (Hadoop, Spark); Link Analysis (PageRank, spam detection); Similarity search (locality-sensitive hashing, shingling, min-hashing); Stream data processing; Recommender Systems; Analysis of social-network graphs; Association rules; Dimensionality reduction (UV, SVD, and CUR decompositions); Algorithms for large-scale mining (clustering, nearest-neighbor search); Large-scale machine learning (decision tree ensembles); Multi-armed bandit; Computational advertising. Prerequisites: At least one of CS107 or CS145.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR
Instructors: Leskovec, J. (PI)

CS 246H: Mining Massive Data Sets Hadoop Lab

Supplement to CS 246 providing additional material on the Apache Hadoop family of technologies. Students will learn how to implement data mining algorithms using Hadoop and Apache Spark, how to implement and debug complex data mining and data transformations, and how to use two of the most popular big data SQL tools. Topics: data mining, machine learning, data ingest, and data transformations using Hadoop, Spark, Apache Impala, Apache Hive, Apache Kafka, Apache Sqoop, Apache Flume, Apache Avro, and Apache Parquet. Prerequisite: CS 107 or equivalent.
Last offered: Winter 2020

CS 247A: Design for Artificial Intelligence (SYMSYS 195A)

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; you must plan on attending every studio to take this class. The focus of CS247A is design for human-centered artificial intelligence experiences. What does it mean to design for AI? What is HAI? How do you create responsible, ethical, human centered experiences? Let us explore what AI actually is and the constraints, opportunities and specialized processes necessary to create AI systems that work effectively for the humans involved. Prerequisites: CS147 or equivalent background in design thinking.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Stanford, J. (PI)

CS 247B: Design for Behavior Change (SYMSYS 195B)

Over the last decade, tech companies have invested in shaping user behavior, sometimes for altruistic reasons like helping people change bad habits into good ones, and sometimes for financial reasons such as increasing engagement. In this project-based hands-on course, students explore the design of systems, information and interface for human use. We will model the flow of interactions, data and context, and crafting a design that is useful, appropriate and robust. Students will design and prototype utility apps or games as a response to the challenges presented. We will also examine the ethical consequences of design decisions and explore current issues arising from unintended consequences. Prerequisite: CS147 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Wodtke, C. (PI)

CS 247G: Introduction to Game Design (SYMSYS 195G)

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; please plan on attending every studio to take this class. nThe focus of CS247g is an introduction to theory and practice of the design of games. We will make digital and paper games, do rapid iteration and run user research studies appropriate to game design. This class has multiple short projects, allowing us to cover a variety of genres, from narrative to pure strategy. Prerequisites: 147 or equivalent background.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CS 247I: Design for Understanding

Complex problems require sophisticated approaches. In this project-based hands-on course, students explore the design of systems, information and interface for human use. We will model the flow of interactions, data and context, and crafting a design that is useful, appropriate and robust. Students will create utility apps or games as a response to the challenges presented. We will also examine the ethical consequences of design decisions and explore current issues arising from unintended consequences. Prerequisite: CS 147 or equivalent.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

CS 247S: Service Design (SYMSYS 195S)

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; you must plan on attending every studio to take this class. The focus of CS247S is Service Design. In this course we will be looking at experiences that address the needs of multiple types of stakeholders at different touchpoints - digital, physical, and everything in between. If you have ever taken an Uber, participated in the Draw, engaged with your bank, or ordered a coffee through the Starbucks app, you have experienced a service that must have a coordinated experience for the customer, the service provider, and any other stakeholders involved. Let us explore what specialized tools and processes are required to created these multi-faceted interactions. Prerequisites: CS147 or equivalent background in design thinking.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Stanford, J. (PI)

CS 248: Interactive Computer Graphics

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to interactive computer graphics, focusing on fundamental concepts and techniques, as well as their cross-cutting relationship to multiple problem domains in interactive graphics (such as rendering, animation, geometry, image processing). Topics include: 2D and 3D drawing, sampling theory, interpolation, rasterization, image compositing, the real-time GPU graphics pipeline (and parallel rendering), VR rendering, geometric transformations, curves and surfaces, geometric data structures, subdivision, meshing, spatial hierarchies, image processing, time integration, physically-based animation, and inverse kinematics. The course will involve several in-depth programming assignments and a self-selected final project that explores concepts covered in the class. Prerequisite: CS 107, MATH 51.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CS 250: Algebraic Error Correcting Codes (EE 387)

Introduction to the theory of error correcting codes, emphasizing algebraic constructions, and diverse applications throughout computer science and engineering. Topics include basic bounds on error correcting codes; Reed-Solomon and Reed-Muller codes; list-decoding, list-recovery and locality. Applications may include communication, storage, complexity theory, pseudorandomness, cryptography, streaming algorithms, group testing, and compressed sensing. Prerequisites: Linear algebra, basic probability (at the level of, say, CS109, CME106 or EE178) and "mathematical maturity" (students will be asked to write proofs). Familiarity with finite fields will be helpful but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Wootters, M. (PI)

CS 251: Cryptocurrencies and blockchain technologies

For advanced undergraduates and for graduate students. The potential applications for Bitcoin-like technologies is enormous. The course will cover the technical aspects of cryptocurrencies, blockchain technologies, and distributed consensus. Students will learn how these systems work and how to engineer secure software that interacts with the Bitcoin network and other cryptocurrencies. Prerequisite: CS110. Recommended: CS255.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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