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11 - 20 of 247 results for: CS

CS 50: Using Tech for Good

Students in the class will work in small teams to implement high-impact projects for partner organizations. Taught by the CS+Social Good team, the aim of the class is to empower you to leverage technology for social good by inspiring action, facilitating collaboration, and forging pathways towards global change. Recommended: CS 106B, CS 42 or 142. Class is open to students of all years. May be repeated for credit. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects

Introduces students to the tech + social good space. Students work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and non-profit domain experts. Main class components are workshops, community discussions, guest speakers and mentorship. Studio provides an outlet for students to create social change through CS while engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their project ideas and Minimum Viable Product prototypes with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 147, equivalent experience, or consent of instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 52: CS + Social Good Studio

Continuation of CS51 (CS + Social Good Studio). Teams enter the quarter having completed and tested a minimal viable product (MVP) with a well-defined target user, and a community partner. Students will learn to apply scalable technical frameworks, methods to measure social impact, tools for deployment, user acquisition techniques and growth/exit strategies. The purpose of the class is to facilitate students to build a sustainable infrastructure around their product idea. CS52 will host mentors, guest speakers and industry experts for various workshops and coaching-sessions. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their projects with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 51, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 53: DISCUSSIONS IN TECH FOR GOOD

This course introduces students to applications of technology to social impact through a weekly discussion and speaker series. Invited speakers come from industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. They will share their work in social impact technology, thoughts on issues of ethics in technology, and personal career paths. Topics span a broad variety of social issues -- from education to healthcare to activism -- and help students better understand how to lead careers in using computer science for social good.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 56N: Great Discoveries and Inventions in Computing

This seminar will explore some of both the great discoveries that underlie computer science and the inventions that have produced the remarkable advances in computing technology. Key questions we will explore include: What is computable? How can information be securely communicated? How do computers fundamentally work? What makes computers fast? Our exploration will look both at the principles behind the discoveries and inventions, as well as the history and the people involved in those events. Some exposure to programming will be helpful, but it not strictly necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hennessy, J. (PI)

CS 58: You Say You Want a Revolution (Blockchain Edition)

This project-based course will give creative students an opportunity to work together on revolutionary change leveraging blockchain technology. The course will provide opportunities for students to become operationally familiar with blockchain concepts, supported by presentation of blockchain fundamentals at a level accessible to those with or without a strong technical background. Specific topics include: incentives, ethics, crypto-commons, values, FOMO 3D, risks, implications and social good. Students will each discover a new possible use-case for blockchain and prototype their vision for the future accordingly. Application and impact areas may come from medicine, law, economics, history, anthropology, or other sectors. Student diversity of background will be valued highly.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

This course interrogates the social challenges of Silicon Valley, a place of privilege, privation, and precarity, and encourages students to perform their own ethnographical studies through writing, coding, engagement, digital culture, and social practice. We will learn about the importance of technology in shaping our critical understanding of social conditions in our community and the global economy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CS 83: Playback Theater For Research

Playback combines elements of theater, community work and storytelling. In a playback show, a group of actors and musicians create an improvised performance based on the audience's personal stories. A playback show brings about a powerful listening and sharing experience. During the course, we will tell, listen, play together, and train in playback techniques. We will write diaries to process our experience in the context of education and research. The course is aimed to strengthen listening abilities, creativity and the collaborative spirit, all integral parts of doing great science. In playback, as in research, we are always moving together, from the known, to the unknown, and back. There is limited enrollment for this class. Application is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Reingold, O. (PI)

CS 100A: Problem-solving Lab for CS106A

Additional problem solving practice for the introductory CS course CS 106A. Sections are designed to allow students to acquire a deeper understanding of CS and its applications, work collaboratively, and develop a mastery of the material. Limited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Concurrent enrollment in CS 106A required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 100B: Problem-solving Lab for CS106B

Additional problem solving practice for the introductory CS course CS106B. Sections are designed to allow students to acquire a deeper understanding of CS and its applications, work collaboratively, and develop a mastery of the material. Limited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Concurrent enrollment in CS 106B required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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