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11 - 20 of 310 results for: CS

CS 41: Hap.py Code: The Python Programming Language

This course is about the fundamentals and contemporary usage of the Python programming language. The primary focus is on developing best practices in writing Python and exploring the extensible and unique parts of the Python language. Topics include: Pythonic conventions, data structures such as list comprehensions, anonymous functions, iterables, powerful built-ins (e.g. map, filter, zip), and Python libraries. For the last few weeks, students will work with course staff to develop their own significant Python project. Prerequisite: CS106B, CS106X, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

CS 43: Functional Programming Abstractions

This course covers the fundamentals of functional programming and algebraic type systems, and explores a selection of related programming paradigms and current research. Haskell is taught and used throughout the course, though much of the material is applicable to other languages. Material will be covered from both theoretical and practical points of view, and topics will include higher order functions, immutable data structures, algebraic data types, type inference, lenses and optics, effect systems, concurrency and parallelism, and dependent types. Prerequisites: Programming maturity and comfort with math proofs, at the levels of CS107 and CS103.
Last offered: Winter 2020

CS 44N: Great Ideas in Graphics

A hands-on interactive and fun exploration of great ideas from computer graphics. Motivated by graphics concepts, mathematical foundations and computer algorithms, students will explore an eccentric selection of "great ideas" through short weekly programming projects. Project topics will be selected from a diverse array of computer graphics concepts and historical elements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: James, D. (PI)

CS 47: Cross-Platform Mobile Development

The fundamentals of cross-platform mobile application development using the React Native framework (RN). Primary focus on enabling students to build apps for both iOS and Android using RN. Students will explore the unique aspects that made RN a primary tool for mobile development within Facebook, Instagram, Walmart, Tesla, and UberEats. Skills developed over the course will be consolidated by the completion of a final project. No required prerequisites. Website: web.stanford.edu/class/cs47/. To enroll in the class, please fill the following application: https://forms.gle/nDnuR3R6N9LozXUdA. The application deadline is January 15th at 6:00 pm.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Landay, J. (PI)

CS 49N: Using Bits to Control Atoms

This is a crash course in how to use a stripped-down computer system about the size of a credit card (the rasberry pi computer) to control as many different sensors as we can implement in ten weeks, including LEDs, motion sensors, light controllers, and accelerometers. The ability to fearlessly grab a set of hardware devices, examine the data sheet to see how to use it, and stitch them together using simple code is a secret weapon that software-only people lack, and allows you to build many interesting gadgets. We will start with a "bare metal'' system --- no operating system, no support --- and teach you how to read device data sheets describing sensors and write the minimal code needed to control them (including how to debug when things go wrong, as they always do). This course differs from most in that it is deliberately mostly about what and why rather than how --- our hope is that the things you are able at the end will inspire you to follow the rest of the CS curriculum to understand better how things you've used work. Prerequisites: knowledge of the C programming language. A Linux or Mac laptop that you are comfortable coding on.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Engler, D. (PI)

CS 50: Using Tech for Good

Students in the class will work in small teams to implement high-impact projects for partner organizations. Taught by the CS+Social Good team, the aim of the class is to empower you to leverage technology for social good by inspiring action, facilitating collaboration, and forging pathways towards global change. Recommended: CS 106B, CS 42 or 142. Class is open to students of all years. May be repeated for credit. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 10 units total)

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects

Get real-world experience researching and developing your own social impact project! Students work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and non-profit domain experts. Main class components are workshops, community discussions, guest speakers and mentorship. Studio provides an outlet for students to create social change through CS while engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their project ideas and Minimum Viable Product prototypes with stakeholders and the public. Application required; please see cs51.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 52: CS + Social Good Studio: Implementing Social Good Projects

Continuation of CS51 (CS + Social Good Studio). Teams enter the quarter having completed and tested a minimal viable product (MVP) with a well-defined target user, and a community partner. Students will learn to apply scalable technical frameworks, methods to measure social impact, tools for deployment, user acquisition techniques and growth/exit strategies. The purpose of the class is to facilitate students to build a sustainable infrastructure around their product idea. CS52 will host mentors, guest speakers and industry experts for various workshops and coaching-sessions. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their projects with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 51, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 56N: Great Discoveries and Inventions in Computing

This seminar will explore some of both the great discoveries that underlie computer science and the inventions that have produced the remarkable advances in computing technology. Key questions we will explore include: What is computable? How can information be securely communicated? How do computers fundamentally work? What makes computers fast? Our exploration will look both at the principles behind the discoveries and inventions, as well as the history and the people involved in those events. Some exposure to programming is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Hennessy, J. (PI)

CS 57N: Randomness: Computational and Philosophical Approaches (PHIL 3N)

Is it ever reasonable to make a decision randomly? For example, would you ever let an important choice depend on the flip of a coin? Can randomness help us answer difficult questions more accurately or more efficiently? What is randomness anyway? Can an object be random? Are there genuinely random processes in the world, and if so, how can we tell? In this seminar, we will explore these questions through the lenses of philosophy and computation. By the end of the quarter students should have an appreciation of the many roles that randomness plays in both humanities and sciences, as well as a grasp of some of the key analytical tools used to study the concept. The course will be self-contained, and no prior experience with randomness/probability is necessary.
Last offered: Autumn 2019
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