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131 - 140 of 215 results for: CS

CS 222: Rational Agency and Intelligent Interaction (PHIL 358)

For advanced undergraduates, and M.S. and beginning Ph.D. students. Logic-based methods for knowledge representation, information change, and games in artificial intelligence and philosophy. Topics: knowledge, certainty, and belief; time and action; belief dynamics; preference and social choice; games; and desire and intention. Prerequisite: propositional and first-order logic.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 224M: Multi-Agent Systems

For advanced undergraduates, and M.S. and beginning Ph.D. students. The course serves primarily as an introduction to game theory, including computational aspects. Topics: basic game representations and solution concepts, social choice and mechanism design, multi-agent learning, communication. Applications discussed as appropriate; emphasis is on conceptual matters and theoretical foundations. Prerequisites: very basic probability theory and optimization.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 224S: Spoken Language Processing

Introduction to spoken language technology with an emphasis on dialogue and conversational systems. Automatic speech recognition, extraction of affect and social meaning from speech, speech synthesis, dialogue management, and applications to digital assistants, search, and recommender systems. Prerequisites: CS 124, 221, 224N, or 229.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 224U: Natural Language Understanding (LINGUIST 188, LINGUIST 288)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180, CS 124, CS 224N, CS224S, or CS221; and logical/semantics such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 225B: Robot Programming Laboratory

For robotics and non-robotics students. Students program mobile robots to exhibit increasingly complex behavior (simple dead reckoning and reactivity, goal-directed motion, localization, complex tasks). Topics: motor control and sensor characteristics; sensor fusion, model construction, and robust estimation; control regimes (subsumption, potential fields); probabalistic methods, including Markov localization and particle filters. Student programmed robot contest. Programming is in C++ on Unix machines, done in teams. Prerequisite: programming at the level of 106B, 106X, 205, or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 226: Statistical Techniques in Robotics

Theory and practice of statistical techniques used in robotics and large-scale sensor-based systems. Probabilistic state estimation, Bayes, Kalman, information and particle filters. Simultaneous localization and mapping techniques, and multi-robot sensor fusion. Markov techniques for making decisions under uncertainty, and probabilistic control algorithms and exploration.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 227B: General Game Playing

A general game playing system accepts a formal description of a game to play it without human intervention or algorithms designed for specific games. Hands-on introduction to these systems and artificial intelligence techniques such as knowledge representation, reasoning, learning, and rational behavior. Students create GGP systems to compete with each other and in external competitions. Prerequisite: programming experience. Recommended: 103 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 228: Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques

Probabilistic graphical modeling languages for representing complex domains, algorithms for reasoning using these representations, and learning these representations from data. Topics include: Bayesian and Markov networks, extensions to temporal modeling such as hidden Markov models and dynamic Bayesian networks, exact and approximate probabilistic inference algorithms, and methods for learning models from data. Also included are sample applications to various domains including speech recognition, biological modeling and discovery, medical diagnosis, message encoding, vision, and robot motion planning. Prerequisites: basic probability theory and algorithm design and analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ermon, S. (PI)

CS 231N: Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition

Computer Vision has become ubiquitous in our society, with applications innsearch, image understanding, apps, mapping, medicine, drones, andnself-driving cars. Core to many of these applications are the tasks of image classification, localization and detection. This course is a deep dive into details of neural network architectures with a focus on learning end-to-end models for these tasks, particularly image classification. During the 10-week course, students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks and gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in computer vision. The final assignment will involve training a multi-million parameter convolutional neural network and applying it on the largest image classification dataset (ImageNet). We will focus on teaching how to set up the problem of image recognition, the learning algorithms (e.g. backpropagation), practical engineering tricks for training and fine-tuning the networks and guide the students through hands-on assignments and a final course project. Much of the background and materials of this course will be drawn from the ImageNet Challenge: http://image-net.org/challenges/LSVRC/2014/index. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Python; familiarity with C/C++; CS 131 and CS 229 or equivalents; Math 21 or equivalent, linear algebra.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 232: Digital Image Processing (EE 368)

Image sampling and quantization color, point operations, segmentation, morphological image processing, linear image filtering and correlation, image transforms, eigenimages, multiresolution image processing, noise reduction and restoration, feature extraction and recognition tasks, image registration. Emphasis is on the general principles of image processing. Students learn to apply material by implementing and investigating image processing algorithms in Matlab and optionally on Android mobile devices. Term project. Recommended: EE261, EE278.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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