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61 - 70 of 98 results for: CS ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CS 251: Cryptocurrencies and blockchain technologies

For advanced undergraduates and for graduate students. The potential applications for Bitcoin-like technologies is enormous. The course will cover the technical aspects of cryptocurrencies, blockchain technologies, and distributed consensus. Students will learn how these systems work and how to engineer secure software that interacts with the Bitcoin network and other cryptocurrencies. Prerequisite: CS110. Recommended: CS255.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Boneh, D. (PI)

CS 253: Web Security

Principles of web security. The fundamentals and state-of-the-art in web security. Attacks and countermeasures. Topics include: the browser security model, web app vulnerabilities, injection, denial-of-service, TLS attacks, privacy, fingerprinting, same-origin policy, cross site scripting, authentication, JavaScript security, emerging threats, defense-in-depth, and techniques for writing secure code. Course projects include writing security exploits, defending insecure web apps, and implementing emerging web standards. Prerequisite: CS 142 or equivalent web development experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 265: Randomized Algorithms and Probabilistic Analysis (CME 309)

Randomness pervades the natural processes around us, from the formation of networks, to genetic recombination, to quantum physics. Randomness is also a powerful tool that can be leveraged to create algorithms and data structures which, in many cases, are more efficient and simpler than their deterministic counterparts. This course covers the key tools of probabilistic analysis, and application of these tools to understand the behaviors of random processes and algorithms. Emphasis is on theoretical foundations, though we will apply this theory broadly, discussing applications in machine learning and data analysis, networking, and systems. Topics include tail bounds, the probabilistic method, Markov chains, and martingales, with applications to analyzing random graphs, metric embeddings, random walks, and a host of powerful and elegant randomized algorithms. Prerequisites: CS 161 and STAT 116, or equivalents and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Valiant, G. (PI)

CS 269O: Introduction to Optimization Theory (MS&E 213)

Introduction of core algorithmic techniques and proof strategies that underlie the best known provable guarantees for minimizing high dimensional convex functions. Focus on broad canonical optimization problems and survey results for efficiently solving them, ultimately providing the theoretical foundation for further study in optimization. In particular, focus will be on first-order methods for both smooth and non-smooth convex function minimization as well as methods for structured convex function minimization, discussing algorithms such as gradient descent, accelerated gradient descent, mirror descent, Newton's method, interior point methods, and more. Prerequisite: multivariable calculus and linear algebra.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 273B: Deep Learning in Genomics and Biomedicine (BIODS 237, BIOMEDIN 273B, GENE 236)

Recent breakthroughs in high-throughput genomic and biomedical data are transforming biological sciences into "big data" disciplines. In parallel, progress in deep neural networks are revolutionizing fields such as image recognition, natural language processing and, more broadly, AI. This course explores the exciting intersection between these two advances. The course will start with an introduction to deep learning and overview the relevant background in genomics and high-throughput biotechnology, focusing on the available data and their relevance. It will then cover the ongoing developments in deep learning (supervised, unsupervised and generative models) with the focus on the applications of these methods to biomedical data, which are beginning to produced dramatic results. In addition to predictive modeling, the course emphasizes how to visualize and extract interpretable, biological insights from such models. Recent papers from the literature will be presented and discussed. Stude more »
Recent breakthroughs in high-throughput genomic and biomedical data are transforming biological sciences into "big data" disciplines. In parallel, progress in deep neural networks are revolutionizing fields such as image recognition, natural language processing and, more broadly, AI. This course explores the exciting intersection between these two advances. The course will start with an introduction to deep learning and overview the relevant background in genomics and high-throughput biotechnology, focusing on the available data and their relevance. It will then cover the ongoing developments in deep learning (supervised, unsupervised and generative models) with the focus on the applications of these methods to biomedical data, which are beginning to produced dramatic results. In addition to predictive modeling, the course emphasizes how to visualize and extract interpretable, biological insights from such models. Recent papers from the literature will be presented and discussed. Students will be introduced to and work with popular deep learning software frameworks. Students will work in groups on a final class project using real world datasets. Prerequisites: College calculus, linear algebra, basic probability and statistics such as CS 109, and basic machine learning such as CS 229. No prior knowledge of genomics is necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 274: Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology (BIOE 214, BIOMEDIN 214, GENE 214)

Topics: introduction to bioinformatics and computational biology, algorithms for alignment of biological sequences and structures, computing with strings, phylogenetic tree construction, hidden Markov models, basic structural computations on proteins, protein structure prediction, protein threading techniques, homology modeling, molecular dynamics and energy minimization, statistical analysis of 3D biological data, integration of data sources, knowledge representation and controlled terminologies for molecular biology, microarray analysis, machine learning (clustering and classification), and natural language text processing. Prerequisite: CS 106B; recommended: CS161; consent of instructor for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CS 275: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOE 217, BIOMEDIN 217, GENE 217)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

CS 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOE 279, BIOMEDIN 279, BIOPHYS 279, CME 279)

Computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules and cells. These computational methods play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course topics include protein structure prediction, protein design, drug screening, molecular simulation, cellular-level simulation, image analysis for microscopy, and methods for solving structures from crystallography and electron microscopy data. Prerequisites: elementary programming background ( CS 106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 300: Departmental Lecture Series

Priority given to first-year Computer Science Ph.D. students. CS Masters students admitted if space is available. Presentations by members of the department faculty, each describing informally his or her current research interests and views of computer science as a whole.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CS 309A: Cloud Computing Seminar

For science, engineering, computer science, business, education, medicine, and law students. Cloud computing is bringing information systems out of the back office and making it core to the entire economy. Furthermore with the advent of smarter machines cloud computing will be integral to building a more precision planet. This class is intended for all students who want to begin to understand the implications of this technology. Guest industry experts are public company CEOs who are either delivering cloud services or using cloud services to transform their businesses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Chou, T. (PI)
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