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21 - 30 of 35 results for: COMPLIT ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMPLIT 246: Advanced Readings in Persian

Through studies of representative works of Persian literature (prose and poetry) and culture (art, history, music, cinema, journalism) the course familiarizes students with a wide range of styles. The aim is to enhance both reading and writing skills in connection with an active understanding of cultural and linguistic codes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Huber, M. (PI)

COMPLIT 248B: Reading Turkish II

This course is the continuation of COMPLIT 248A Reading Turkish I, which served as an introduction to the structures of the Turkish language necessary for reading. It is designed to develop reading competence in Turkish for graduate students. Undergraduates should consult the instructor before enrolling for the course. Essential grammar, syntax points, vocabulary, and reading skills will be emphasized. This is not a traditional language course that takes an integrated four-skill approach; it focuses only on reading, and as a result we will be able to cover advanced material in a short amount of time. This course is conducted in English, but students will be exposed to the sounds of Turkish, and will have the opportunity to practice pronunciation in class. COMPLIT 248B is followed by COMPLIT 248C Advanced Turkish for Research in the Spring.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Karahan, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 249B: Iranian Cinema in Diaspora (GLOBAL 249B)

Despite enormous obstacles, immigrant Iranian filmmakers, within a few decades (after the Iranian Revolution), have created a slow but steady stream of films outside Iran. They were originally started by individual spontaneous attempts from different corners of the world and by now we can identify common lines of interest amongst them. There are also major differences between them. These films have never been allowed to be screened inside Iran, and without any support from the global system of production and distribution, as independent and individual attempts, they have enjoyed little attention. Despite all this, Iranian cinema in exile is in no sense any less important than Iranian cinema inside Iran. In this course we will view one such film, made outside Iran, in each class meeting and expect to reach a common consensus in identifying the general patterns within these works and this movement. Questions such as the ones listed below will be addressed in our meetings each week: What more »
Despite enormous obstacles, immigrant Iranian filmmakers, within a few decades (after the Iranian Revolution), have created a slow but steady stream of films outside Iran. They were originally started by individual spontaneous attempts from different corners of the world and by now we can identify common lines of interest amongst them. There are also major differences between them. These films have never been allowed to be screened inside Iran, and without any support from the global system of production and distribution, as independent and individual attempts, they have enjoyed little attention. Despite all this, Iranian cinema in exile is in no sense any less important than Iranian cinema inside Iran. In this course we will view one such film, made outside Iran, in each class meeting and expect to reach a common consensus in identifying the general patterns within these works and this movement. Questions such as the ones listed below will be addressed in our meetings each week: What changes in aesthetics and point of view of the filmmaker are caused by the change in his or her work environment? Though unwantedly these films are made outside Iran, how related are they to the known (recognized) cinema within Iran? And in fact, to what extent do these films express things that are left unsaid by the cinema within Iran? NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Beyzaie, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 252A: Great Arabic Poetry

Introduction to the canon of Arabic poetry from the sixth to the twenty-first century. Imru' al-Qays, al-Mutanabbi, Mahmud Darwish, and more. Readings in Arabic. Two years of Arabic at Stanford or equivalent required. Counts for the Arabic Track in the MELLAC Minor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Key, A. (PI)

COMPLIT 259A: Levinas and Literature (JEWISHST 249A)

Focus is on major works by French phenomenologist Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995) and their import for literary studies. Aim is to discuss and evaluate Levinas's (often latent) aesthetics through a close reading of his work in phenomenology, ethics, and Jewish philosophy. If poetry has come to seem barbaric (or at least useless) in a world so deeply shaped by genocide, forced migration, and climate change, Levinas offers a clear and deeply engaged path forward. If you love literature but still haven't figured out what on earth it might be good for, this course is for you. Readings and discussion in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barletta, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 303D: Thinking in Fiction (ENGLISH 303D)

Is there a boundary between fact and fiction? Is fiction a stable category at all? Should we be thinking instead about description, factual reference, the place of history, and the methods of science? This course will examine the ways in which fictions figure in the workings of the human mind and human institutions, as well as in literature. Readings will include work by philosophers and critics stretching from Locke, Hume, and Adam Smith, to twentieth-century figures such as Vaihinger (the philosophy of "as if"), to "possible worlds" theory. Bruno Latour, Marie-Laure Ryan, and Ann Banfield will be joined by Catherine Gallagher and narratologists. In reaching back to the eighteenth century, we also can have in mind important essays or prefaces by such writers as Horace Walpole, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, and Anne Radcliffe. Novels, of course, raise large questions about fictionality. Works for study include: The Female Quixote, The Castle of Otranto, Tristram Shandy, and A Simple Story.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bender, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 309: Masterpieces: Orhan Pamuk (COMPLIT 109)

This course explores the major works of Nobel Prize Winner Orhan Pamuk and the novel tradition. We will start with his more classical narratives such as Silent House and move to modernist, post-colonial, and post-modernist works exemplified by The New Life, The White Castle, The Black Book, and My Name is Red. Topics include: East/West, the Ottoman theme, Istanbul, and autobiographical strands in fiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Karahan, B. (PI)

COMPLIT 321: Giambattista Vico (FRENCH 321, ITALIAN 321)

An intensive reading of Vico's New Science. Emphasis will be on Vico's philosophy of history and theories of poetic wisdom, myth, and language. Vico will be put in dialogue with René Descartes, Rousseau, Auguste Compte, Claude Lévi Strauss, and Paul Feyerabend, whose ideas about myth and science converge in striking ways with Vico's.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)

COMPLIT 327: Genres of the Novel (ENGLISH 327, FRENCH 327)

Provides students with an overview of some major genres in the history of the modern novel, along with major theorists in the critical understanding of the form. Novels might include works by Cervantes, Defoe, Lafayette, Radcliffe, Goethe, Scott, Balzac, Melville, and Woolf. Theorists might include Lukacs, Bakhtin, Jameson, Gallagher, Barthes, Kristeva, and Bourdieu. *PLEASE NOTE: Course for graduate students only.*
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Cohen, M. (PI)

COMPLIT 334B: Concepts of Modernity II: Culture, Aesthetics, and Society in the Age of Globalization (ENGLISH 334B, MTL 334B)

Emphasis on world-system theory, theories of coloniality and power, and aesthetic modernity/postmodernity in their relation to culture broadly understood.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)
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