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11 - 20 of 35 results for: COMPLIT ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMPLIT 127B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (JEWISHST 147B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 133A: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 133, AFRICAST 132, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, political and literary aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry, though we will also read some theoretical texts. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary forms, terms and practices. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French (in addition to reading comprehension) both in and outside of class. Special guest: LEILA SLIMANI (Goncourt Prize 2016). Required readings include: Leila Slimani, "Sexe et Mensonges au Maroc", Albert Memmi, "La Statue de Sel," Kaouther Adimi, "L'Envers des autres", Maryse Condé, "La Vie sans fards". Movies include "Goodbye Morocco", "Aya de Yopougon", "Les Baies d'Alger". nTaught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

COMPLIT 142B: Translating Japan, Translating the West (JAPAN 121, JAPAN 221)

Translation lies at the heart of all intercultural exchange. This course introduces students to the specific ways in which translation has shaped the image of Japan in the West, the image of the West in Japan, and Japan's self-image in the modern period. What texts and concepts were translated by each side, how, and to what effect? No prior knowledge of Japanese language necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Levy, I. (PI)

COMPLIT 154A: Film & Philosophy (ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 154E: Film & Philosophy CE (FRENCH 154E, ITALIAN 154E, PHIL 193E, PHIL 293E)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English. Satisfies the WAY CE.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 172: Visions of a Golden Age: Nature and Pastoral in Literary History

In the light of ecological collapse and climate catastrophe, eco-critics like Timothy Morton have asserted the need to abandon the very concept of nature. For Morton, it is in literature where the development and limitations of nature are most visible. Taking pastoral, i.e. stories about shepherds in idyllic landscapes, as the genre that has done the most in European contexts to shape how nature is seen and understood, this course proposes a historical appraisal of its literary history from ancient Greece to the twenty-first century. How has pastoral constructed nature? How has this changed over time? What is the relation between the historical contingency of nature as it develops in literary history and theories of human nature? While tracking the development of nature as a concept in plays, poems, and prose will be our main focus, this course will also investigate the ways in which shepherd lives and songs have shaped debates on gender, criticized city-life, depicted a Golden Age and more »
In the light of ecological collapse and climate catastrophe, eco-critics like Timothy Morton have asserted the need to abandon the very concept of nature. For Morton, it is in literature where the development and limitations of nature are most visible. Taking pastoral, i.e. stories about shepherds in idyllic landscapes, as the genre that has done the most in European contexts to shape how nature is seen and understood, this course proposes a historical appraisal of its literary history from ancient Greece to the twenty-first century. How has pastoral constructed nature? How has this changed over time? What is the relation between the historical contingency of nature as it develops in literary history and theories of human nature? While tracking the development of nature as a concept in plays, poems, and prose will be our main focus, this course will also investigate the ways in which shepherd lives and songs have shaped debates on gender, criticized city-life, depicted a Golden Age and the ideal state of humankind, and confronted political tyranny. Students will analyze poems, prose, and plays as autonomous works of art that shape how we imagine and understand nature. Reading literary texts from different moments in history and from a diversity of cultural contexts will permit students to reflect critically on their own conceptions of nature and those of contemporary political and economic discourses. The course will empower students to construct their own literary histories of nature and bring literature to bear on contemporary debates about the environment and climate change.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 194: Independent Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 199: Senior Seminar

What is criticism? When we interpret literature today, are we fulfilling the critical vocation? What are the alternatives? We consider the origins of the idea of the critic in nineteenth-century culture, its development in the twentieth century, and its current exponents, revisionists, and dissenters. Senior seminar for Comparative Literature Senior majors only.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 208: The Cosmopolitan Introvert: Modern Greek Poetry and its Itinerants

Overview of the last century of Greek poetry with emphasis on modernism. Approximately 20 modern Greek poets (starting with Cavafy and Nobel laureates Seferis and Elytis and moving to more modern writers) are read and compared to other major European and American writers. The themes of the cosmopolitan itinerant and of the introvert, often co-existing in the same poet, connect these idiosyncratic voices. The course uses translations and requires no knowledge of Greek but original texts can also be shared with interested students. Note: The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 234: Classics of Persian Literature

The course offers a survey of and introduction to the central works of Persian literature, from the 10th century to our time, across the genres: epic, romance, lyric, and novel. Special attention will be given to the various ways in which the texts continue to resonate in Persian culture. Readings include: the Shahnameh by Ferdowsi (940-1020); Khosrow and Shirin by Nezami (1141-1209); The Conference of the Birds by Attar (1145/46-1221); selections from the masnavi and divan of Rumi (d. 1273); selections from the divan of Hafez (1325/26-1389/90); The Blind Owl by Sadegh Hedayat (1903-1951); selected poems by Nima (1895-1960), Shamlu (1925-2000), Akhavan Sales (1928-1990), and Forugh Farrokhzad (1935-1967); and My Uncle Napoleon by Iraj Pezeshkzad (1928-). Taught in English.

Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Huber, M. (PI)
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