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21 - 30 of 50 results for: COMM

COMM 230B: Digital Civil Society

Digital technologies have fundamentally changed how people come together to make change in the world, a sphere of action commonly called 'civil society'. How did this happen, what's being done about it, and what does it mean for democratic governance and collective action in the future? This course analyzes the opportunities and challenges technology presents to associational life, free expression, individual privacy, and collective action. Year-long seminar sequence for advanced undergraduates or master's students. Each quarter may be taken independently. Winter Quarter focuses on the 2000s and considers the emergence of social media platforms, the rise of mobile connectivity, institutional shifts in journalism, and major developments in intellectual property, state surveillance, and digital activism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

COMM 230X: Digital Civil Society +1 Series

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

COMM 235: Deliberative Democracy and its Critics (AMSTUD 135, COMM 135, COMM 335, ETHICSOC 135F, POLISCI 234P, POLISCI 334P)

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Fishkin, J. (PI)

COMM 251: The First Amendment: Freedom of Speech and Press (COMM 151, ETHICSOC 151, POLISCI 125P)

Introduction to the constitutional protections for freedom of speech, press, and expressive association. All the major Supreme Court cases dealing with issues such as incitement, libel, hate speech, obscenity, commercial speech, and campaign finance. There are no prerequisites, but a basic understanding of American government would be useful. In addition to a final and midterm exam, students participate in a moot court on a hypothetical case. (Grad students register for COMM 251)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

COMM 253B: Free Speech, Democracy and the Internet (COMM 153B)

Crosslisted with LAW 7082. This course will cover contemporary challenges to democracy presented by the Internet. Topics will include disinformation, polarization, hate speech, media transformation, election integrity, and legal regulation of internet platforms in the U.S. and abroad. Guest speakers from academia and industry will present on these topics in each class session, followed by a discussion. Students will be responsible for one-page papers each week on the readings and a research paper to be turned in at the fall paper deadline. Students can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the research paper length. This class is limited to 30 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (20 students will be selected by lottery) and 10 non-law students by consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

COMM 262: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 162, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Iyengar, S. (PI)

COMM 264: The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America (COMM 164, POLISCI 124L, POLISCI 324L, PSYCH 170)

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 274D: Public Affairs Data Journalism II

Learn how to find, create and analyze data to tell news stories with public service impact. Uses relational databases, advanced queries, basic statistics, and mapping to analyze data for storytelling. Assignments may include stories, blog posts, and data visualizations, with at least one in-depth project based on data analysis. Prerequisites: COMM 273D or Journalism M.A. student.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin,  http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite:  EarthSys 191/291,  COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from seema@yasminacademy.com . (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Hayden, T. (PI)

COMM 277P: Programming in Journalism (COMM 177P)

This course introduces general purpose programming skills commonly used in the news. Students will gain basic proficiency in the Unix shell and Python programming while practicing skills such as web scraping, acquiring data from public APIs, cleaning and transforming data, and working with spreadsheets and databases. Automation and reproducibility will be important themes in the course. Exercises and projects will focus on helping students understand the nuances of obtaining and preparing data for use in data analysis and web applications for the news. Students must have basic SQL skills for this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Tumgoren, S. (PI)
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