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11 - 20 of 141 results for: COMM

COMM 122: Content Analysis: Studying Communication Artifacts (COMM 222)

An empirical and systematic investigation of documented messages in print, graphical, and audio-visual forms and observed human communication behaviors. Focuses on the design and execution of content analytic studies, including manifest vs. latent content, measurement issues, reliability and validity assessment, computer text analysis, and traditional human-coder techniques. Prerequisite: junior, senior or grad standing; COMM 106/206 or an equivalent course in basic social science research. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Voelker, D. (PI)

COMM 123: Argumentation and Persuasion (COMM 223)

We all know that appeals based on logic and sound evidence often fail where less rational appeals that "shouldn't" work, succeed. This course examines persuasion, the influencing of attitudes, beliefs or behavior, and locates within that broad subject argumentation, the process of reasoning methodically from evidence. Argumentation, the socially acceptable method of persuasion, typically confines itself to the rules of logic and has as its goal the recognition of states and causal relationships held by the arguer to objectively exist. Other methods of persuasion can succeed while flouting those rules, but only within limits, as the story of the Emperor's New Clothes reminds us. This course will explore whether those limits be accounted for by the capacity limitations and heuristics and biases of human information processing. Topics to be covered include evolutionary explanations; the central and peripheral routes to persuasion; source, channel and receiver factors; attitude-behavior consistency; the roles of involvement, elaboration, affect and social influence; critical thinking skills and logical fallacies. Limited enrollment; preference to juniors, seniors and graduate students, and within these, to Communication majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Voelker, D. (PI)

COMM 124: Digital Deception (COMM 224)

Deception is one of the most significant and pervasive social phenomena of our age. Lies range from the trivial to the very serious, including deception between friends and family, in the workplace, and in security and intelligence contexts. At the same time, information and communication technologies have pervaded almost all aspects of human communication, from everyday technologies that support interpersonal interactions to, such as email and instant messaging, to more sophisticated systems that support organization-level interactions. Given the prevalence of both deception and communication technology in our personal and professional lives, an important set of questions have recently emerged about how humans adapt their deceptive practices to new communication and information technologies, including how communication technology affects the practice of lying and the detection of deception, and whether technology can be used to identify deception.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 125: Perspectives on American Journalism (COMM 225)

(Graduate students register for COMM 225.) An examination of the practice of American journalism, focusing on the political, social, cultural, economic and technological forces that have shaped the U. S. press since the early 1800s. Aimed at consumers as well as producers of news, the objective of this course is to provide a framework and vocabulary for judging the value and quality of everyday journalism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 131: Media Ethics and Responsibility (COMM 231)

(Graduate students register for COMM 231.) The development of professionalism among American journalists, emphasizing the emergence of objectivity as a professional and the epistemological norm. An applied ethics course where questions of power, freedom, and truth autonomy are treated normatively so as to foster critical thinking about the origins and implications of commonly accepted standards of responsible journalism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 133: Need to Know: The Tension between a Free Press and National Security Decision Making (COMM 233)

This seminar will examine the dynamic interaction at the highest levels of government and the media when news coverage of secret national security policy and operations impinges on United States defense, diplomatic and intelligence activities and decision making. A prime example: the torrent of secret NSA programs disclosed by Edward Snowden in newspapers and other media. Students will explore attitudes, practices and actions by the media and the government through a series of case studies and simulations. Former editors, reporters and government officials will appear as guest speakers. The goal of the course is to inform students about the vital but often fraught relationship between a free press and the government in a democratic society, especially in the management of national security affairs. For advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Application for enrollment required. The instructor is a former Washington bureau chief of The New York Times. Please email Anne Stickells (annees7@stanford.edu) to request an application. Completed applications are due by 6pm on March 21, 2015. (Grad students register for COMM 233)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Taubman, P. (PI)

COMM 135: Deliberative Democracy and its Critics (AMSTUD 135, COMM 235, COMM 335, POLISCI 234P, POLISCI 334P)

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. In spring quarter 2015, this course will have a special focus on deliberative democracy in the the Greater China region. The course will discuss whether a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age. What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Case studies from the Deliberative Polling method and other deliberation methods, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a cases studies for discussion. Some course sessions will utilize the case method to examine public consultations, the media, and civil society. Throughout the course, students will address how public participation is currently conducted around the world. As we have all seen successful, but more likely unsuccessful attempts to consult the public and this course will examine the various ways of consulting the public and how governments, media, and the public have responded and used the results.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Siu, A. (PI)

COMM 137W: The Dialogue of Democracy (AMSTUD 137, COMM 237, POLISCI 232T, POLISCI 332T)

All forms of democracy require some kind of communication so people can be aware of issues and make decisions. This course looks at competing visions of what democracy should be and different notions of the role of dialogue in a democracy. Is it just campaigning or does it include deliberation? Small scale discussions or sound bites on television? Or social media? What is the role of technology in changing our democratic practices, to mobilize, to persuade, to solve public problems? This course will include readings from political theory about democratic ideals - from the American founders to J.S. Mill and the Progressives to Joseph Schumpeter and modern writers skeptical of the public will. It will also include contemporary examinations of the media and the internet to see how those practices are changing and how the ideals can or cannot be realized.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 140: Digital Media Entrepreneurship (COMM 240)

(Graduate students register for COMM 240.) Primarily for graduate journalism and computer science students. Silicon Valley's new media culture, digital storytelling skills and techniques, web-based skills, and entrepreneurial ventures. Guest speakers. Prerequisite: Instructor consent/completed application. Application can be found at: http://dme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Grimes, A. (PI)

COMM 142W: Media Economics (COMM 242)

Uses economics to examine the generation and consumption of information in communication markets. Covers concepts that play a large role in information economics, including public goods, economies of scale, product differentiation, and externalities. Looks at individuals¿ information demands as consumers, producers, audience members, and voters. Topics include economics of Internet, sustainability of accountability journalism, and marketplace of ideas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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