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11 - 20 of 36 results for: COMM ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMM 225: Perspectives on American Journalism (AMSTUD 125, COMM 125)

An examination of American journalism, focusing on how news is produced, distributed, and financially supported. Emphasis on current media controversies and puzzles, and on designing innovations in discovering and telling stories. (Graduate students register for COMM 225.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Hamilton, J. (PI)

COMM 230A: Digital Civil Society

Digital technologies have fundamentally changed how people come together to make change in the world, a sphere of action commonly called 'civil society'. How did this happen, what's being done about it, and what does it mean for democratic governance and collective action in the future? This course analyzes the opportunities and challenges technology presents to associational life, free expression, individual privacy, and collective action. Year-long seminar sequence for advanced undergraduates or master's students. Each quarter may be taken independently. Fall Quarter focuses on the emergence of digital technologies in the 1990's. Topics include popular adoption of the internet, development of international networks, creation of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Internet Archive, emergence of the digital economy, the dot com bubble, key pieces of technology legislation, and legal battles over free expression.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

COMM 230X: Digital Civil Society +1 Series

Speaker series examining the history, theory, legal challenges, policy frameworks and economic choices that have shaped digital networks and technologies, and how those technologies have in turn changed the nature and role of civil society in democracies. Required component of the Comm230 - Digital Civil Society; also open to enrollment by other students and to the public.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

COMM 254: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, CSRE 154T, SOC 154, SOC 254C)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Christin, A. (PI)

COMM 266: Virtual People (COMM 166)

(Graduate students register for COMM 266.) The concept of virtual people or digital human representations; methods of constructing and using virtual people; methodological approaches to interactions with and among virtual people; and current applications. Viewpoints including popular culture, literature, film, engineering, behavioral science, computer science, and communication.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

COMM 273D: Public Affairs Data Journalism I

Even before the ubiquity of Internet access and high-powered computers, public accountability reporting relied on the concerted collection of observations and analytical problem-solving. We study the methods, and the data, used to discover leads and conduct in-depth reporting on public affairs, including election finance and safety regulations. Students gain practical experience with the digital tools and techniques of computer-assisted reporting. Prerequisite: Only open to Journalism M.A. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Tumgoren, S. (PI)

COMM 275: Multimedia Storytelling: Reporting and Production Using Audio, Still Images, and Video

Multimedia assignments coordinated with deadline reporting efforts in COMM 273 from traditional news beats using audio, still photography, and video. Use of digital audio recorders and audio production to leverage voice-over narration, interviews, and natural sound; use of digital still cameras and audio to produce audio slideshows; and the combination of these media with video in post-production with Final Cut Pro. Prerequisite: Only open to Journalism M.A. students. Corequisite: COMM 273.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

COMM 277B: BigLocal Journalism: a project-based class (COMM 177B)

This class will tackle data-driven journalism, in collaboration with other academic and journalistic partners.nThe class is centered around one or more projects rooted in local data-driven journalism but with potential for regional or national journalistic stories and impact. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to negotiate for public records and data, analyze data and report out stories. Some of the work may be published by news organizations or may be used to advance data journalism projects focused on public accountability. Students will gain valuable knowledge and skills in how to negotiate for public records, how to critically analyze data for journalistic purpose and build out reporting and writing skills. Students with a background in journalism (especially data journalism), statistics, computer science, law, or public policy are encouraged to participate. Enrollment is limited. Prerequisite: consent of instructor . May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 279: News Reporting & Writing Fundamentals

Learn beat reporting and writing skills including source development, interviewing, and story structure for news and features. Emphasis on developing news judgment, clear writing skills, and an ability to execute stories on deadline. Exercises and assignments mimic a newsroom. Students pursue local beats with a focus on public issues and complement written pieces with relevant data analyses and multimedia components. Prerequisite: Only open to Journalism M.A. students. Corequisite: COMM 275.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Zacharia, J. (PI)

COMM 281: Exploring Computational Journalism (CS 206)

This project-based course will explore the field of computational journalism, including the use of Data Science, Info Visualization, AI, and emerging technologies to help journalists discover and tell stories, understand their audience, advance free speech, and build trust. Admission by application; please email R.B. Brenner at rbbrenner@stanford.edu to request application.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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