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41 - 50 of 135 results for: COMM

COMM 177I: Investigative Watchdog Reporting (COMM 277I)

Graduate students register for COMM 277I.) Learn how to apply an investigative and data mindset to journalism, from understanding how to background an individual or entity using online databases to compiling or combining disparate sets of information in ways that unveil wrongdoing or mismanagement. Focuses on mining texts, tracking associations, and using visualizations. Stories produced apply investigative techniques to beat reporting, breaking news, and long form journalism. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 177P: Programming in Journalism (COMM 277P)

This course introduces general purpose programming skills commonly used in the news. Students will gain basic proficiency in the Unix shell and Python programming while practicing skills such as web scraping, acquiring data from public APIs, cleaning and transforming data, and working with spreadsheets and databases. Automation and reproducibility will be important themes in the course. Exercises and projects will focus on helping students understand the nuances of obtaining and preparing data for use in data analysis and web applications for the news. Students must have basic SQL skills for this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Tumgoren, S. (PI)

COMM 177SW: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Sports Journalism (COMM 277S)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277S.) Workshop. An examination of American sports writing from the 1920's Golden Age of Sports to present. Students become practitioners of the sports writing craft in an intensive laboratory. Hones journalistic skills such as specialized reporting, interviewing, deadline writing, creation of video projects, and conceptualizing and developing stories for print and online.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

COMM 177T: Building News Applications (COMM 277T)

This course introduces students to the process of building interactive web applications and visualizations for the news. Students will study examples from the news industry and gain proficiency in a range of technical languages, skills and tools: version control, HTML, CSS, Javascript, Python, web protocols, and web hosting and deployment. Class exercises and projects will focus on the use of these technologies to produce applications that tell a story and engage the public. Students must have basic proficiency in Python, SQL and the Unix shell.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Tumgoren, S. (PI)

COMM 177Y: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Foreign Correspondence (COMM 277Y)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277Y.) Study how being a foreign correspondent has evolved and blend new communication tools with clear narrative to tell stories from abroad in a way that engages a diversifying American audience in the digital age. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, COMM 279, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI
Instructors: Zacharia, J. (PI)

COMM 180: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change (CS 182, ETHICSOC 182, PHIL 82, POLISCI 182, PUBLPOL 182)

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

COMM 184: Race and Media (COMM 284)

This course explores the co-construction of media practices and racial identity in the US. We will ask how media have shaped how we think about race. And we will explore the often surprising ways ideas about race have shaped media practices and technologies in turn. The course will draw on contemporary debates as well as historical examples and will cover themes such as representation and visual culture, media industries and audience practices, and racial bias in digital technology.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Li, X. (PI)

COMM 186W: Media, Technology, and the Body (COMM 286)

This course considers major themes in the cultural analysis of the body in relation to media technologies. How do media and information technologies shape our understanding of the body and concepts of bodily difference such as race, gender, and disability? We will explore both classic theories and recent scholarship to examine how technologies mediate the body and bodily practices in various domains, from entertainment to engineering, politics to product design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Li, X. (PI)

COMM 195: Honors Thesis

Qualifies students to conduct communication research. Student must apply for department honors thesis program during Spring Quarter of junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit

COMM 199: Individual Work

For students with high academic standing. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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