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51 - 60 of 127 results for: COMM

COMM 195: Honors Thesis

Qualifies students to conduct communication research. Student must apply for department honors thesis program during Spring Quarter of junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit

COMM 199: Individual Work

For students with high academic standing. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

COMM 206: Communication Research Methods (COMM 106)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Pan, J. (PI)

COMM 208: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 108)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

COMM 211: Mass Media, Society, and Democracy (COMM 1A)

(Graduate students register for COMM 211.) Open to non-majors. This course examines the role of the news media in contemporary society, with particular attention to cross-national variation in the relationships between journalists, politicians, and citizens. We further consider the potentially transforming effects of technology on the media-politics nexus.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Iyengar, S. (PI)

COMM 212: Models of Democracy (COMM 312)

Ancient and modern varieties of democracy; debates about their normative and practical strengths and the pathologies to which each is subject. Focus is on participation, deliberation, representation, and elite competition, as values and political processes. Formal institutions, political rhetoric, technological change, and philosophical critique. Models tested by reference to long-term historical natural experiments such as Athens and Rome, recent large-scale political experiments such as the British Columbia Citizens' Assembly, and controlled experiments.
Last offered: Spring 2010

COMM 213: Computational Methods in the Civic Sphere (COMM 113)

The widespread availability of public data provides a rich opportunity for those who can efficiently filter, interpret, and visualize information. Course develops necessary technical skills for data collection, analysis, and publication, including data mining and web visualization, with a focus on civic affairs and government accountability. Open to all majors and a range of technical skill levels. Involves tackling new tools and technical concepts in the pursuit of engaging, public-facing projects. (Graduate students enroll in 213). Prerequisite COMM 273D, CS 106A, or CS 106B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Nguyen, D. (PI)

COMM 216: Journalism Law (COMM 116)

(Graduate students register for 216.) Laws and regulation impacting journalists. Topics include libel, privacy, news gathering, protection sources, fair trial and free press, theories of the First Amendment, and broadcast regulation. Prerequisite: Journalism M.A. student or advanced Communication major.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Wheaton, J. (PI)

COMM 220: Digital Media in Society (AMSTUD 120, COMM 120W)

Contemporary debates concerning the social and cultural impact of digital media. Topics include the historical origins of digital media, cultural contexts of their development and use, and influence of digital media on conceptions of self, community, and state. Priority to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. To request a permission number, please email blazzari@stanford.edu. Include your student ID, major, and year.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Turner, F. (PI)

COMM 222: Content Analysis: Studying Communication Artifacts (COMM 122)

An empirical and systematic investigation of documented messages in print, graphical, and audio-visual forms and observed human communication behaviors. Focuses on the design and execution of content analytic studies, including manifest vs. latent content, measurement issues, reliability and validity assessment, computer text analysis, and traditional human-coder techniques. Prerequisite: junior, senior or grad standing; COMM 106/206 or an equivalent course in basic social science research. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Voelker, D. (PI)
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