2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

81 - 90 of 141 results for: COMM

COMM 339: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (POLISCI 421K, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 360G: Political Communication (POLISCI 425)

An overview of research in political communication with particular reference to work on the impact of the mass media on public opinion and voting behavior. Limited to Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: 260 or consent of instructor.

COMM 361: Regulation of the Political Process (POLISCI 327C)

Combined with LAW 577. This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of the themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover all the major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and the 2000 presidential election controversy. The course pays particular attention to competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions that underlie the Court's reasoning while still focusing on the cases as litigation tools used to serve political ends. Elements used in grading: Class participation and one day take home final exam. ( POLISCI 327C; LAW 577)
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

COMM 368: Experimental Research in Advanced User Interfaces (COMM 168, COMM 268, ME 468)

Project-based course involves small (3-4) person teams going through all parts of the experimental process: question generation, experiment design, running, and data analysis. Each team creates an original, publishable project that represents a contribution to the research and practicum literatures. All experiments involve interaction between people and technology, including cars, mobile phones, websites, etc. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
| Repeatable for credit

COMM 801: TGR Project

| Repeatable for credit

COMM 100S: Self-Representation in Digital Media

Digital media allows ordinary people to document, publicize and reinvent themselves in ways previously only available to the elite. In the first half of this course, we will examine how Westerners have represented themselves as individuals. We will focus on photography, as indicative of a shift in prevalence of self-representation to the masses. In the second half of the course, we will examine how the ways in which individuals are represented may affect their understanding of themselves. Students will experiment with self-representation in different media, including creating virtual representations (avatars) of themselves to be inhabited in immersive virtual reality in the Virtual Human Interaction Lab. In the process, they will learn how the shared digital world shadows, interprets and sometimes overwrites the physical world and day-to day life.

COMM 102S: Political Communication and Social Media

This course will explore how social media and mobile computing platforms affect the modern political landscape. Topics: how these technologies change the mix of news, information and campaign materials we get; structure our relationships with candidates and representatives; augment modern politicians' fundraising and campaign efforts; and make possible new forms of political organization and collective action. Possible case studies: the Obama campaign's successful use of social/mobile technology to campaign in 2008 and 2012; how constituents use social media to communicate with their representatives; and the role of social-mobile technologies in modern revolutionary movements.

COMM 103S: Media Entertainment

The impact of media entertainment on individuals, social groups, and societies. Sources include a diverse cross-section of entertainment. Introduction to psychological and socio-psychological theories. Empirical findings relating to media entertainment as a stimulus and a reception phenomenon. What renders diverse genres of media content and format enjoyable? Why do individuals pursue entertainment experiences in ever-increasing numbers? What is the political impact of apolitical media entertainment?
Instructors: Bosshart, L. (PI)

COMM 106S: Communication Research Methods

An introduction to social science research methods for those who have little or no prior experience in statistics. Designed to provide students with a critical framework and a set of tools to examine social problems - especially those related to the area of communication and the media. Students will be guided through the process of formulating real-world research questions, parsing them into analyzable statements, engaging in systematic data collection and analysis, and finally, thinking about value and limits of its outcome. Hands-on research experience provided.
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints