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71 - 80 of 135 results for: COMM

COMM 253A: What The 2018 Elections Told Us And How They Help Us See How Campaigns Can Win In 2020 (COMM 153A, POLISCI 72, PUBLPOL 146, PUBLPOL 246)

(Same as LAW 7057). The frequency of American elections means that we're never that far away from the next contest. This course is situated shortly after the conclusion of the 2018 midterm elections at the very start of the invisible primary that precedes the 2020 presidential campaign. It will provide students with a behind-the-scenes understanding of how campaigns work. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to high-profile campaigns -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature prominent guest speakers who have served and will serve in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns. Our goal is to discern the lessons learned from the 2018 midterm elections, and how they will inform our understanding of what will happen in the 2020 presidential contest
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Repeatable for credit

COMM 253B: Free Speech, Democracy and the Internet (COMM 153B)

Crosslisted with LAW 7082. This course, which will be cotaught by Monika Bickert from Facebook, will cover contemporary challenges to democracy presented by the Internet. Topics will include disinformation, polarization, hate speech, media transformation, election integrity, and legal regulation of internet platforms in the U.S. and abroad. Guest speakers from academia and industry will present on these topics in each class session, followed by a discussion. Students will be responsible for one-page papers each week on the readings and a research paper to be turned in at the fall paper deadline. Students can take the class for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the research paper length. This class is crosslisted in the university and undergraduates are eligible to take it. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

COMM 254: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, CSRE 154T, SOC 154, SOC 254C)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

COMM 257: Information Control in Authoritarian Regimes (COMM 157, COMM 357)

Does information help autocrats and dictators stay in power? Or does information help topple authoritarian regimes? This course will examine how authoritarian regimes try to control information through surveillance, propaganda, and censorship, what influences the effectiveness of these information control measures, and how changes in technology (Internet, social media, mobile) affect the dynamics of information control.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

COMM 258: Censorship and Propaganda (COMM 158)

While the internet and other digital technologies have amplified the voice of ordinary citizens, the power of governments and other large organizations to control and to manipulate information is increasingly apparent. In this course, we will examine censorship and propaganda in the age of the internet and social media. What constitutes censorship and propaganda in the digital age? Who conducts censorship and propaganda, and how? What are the consequences and effects of censorship and propaganda in this era of information proliferation? How have censorship and propaganda changed from previous eras? Students will take a hands-on, project-based approach to exploring these questions.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

COMM 262: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 162, POLISCI 120B)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

COMM 264: The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America (COMM 164, POLISCI 124L, POLISCI 324L, PSYCH 170)

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

COMM 266: Virtual People (COMM 166)

(Graduate students register for COMM 266.) The concept of virtual people or digital human representations; methods of constructing and using virtual people; methodological approaches to interactions with and among virtual people; and current applications. Viewpoints including popular culture, literature, film, engineering, behavioral science, computer science, and communication.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

COMM 271: Moving Pictures: Video Journalism for mobile and social platforms (COMM 171)

(Graduate students register for 271.) Examine video journalism's crucial role in digital news media across mobile and social media platforms. What are the specific needs of mobile platforms? How is new technology utilized to produce effective video news content? We'll examine case studies and hear from guest speakers about innovations in video journalism. Students produce short video journalism pieces using mobile tools, optimized for viewing on mobile devices. Prerequisite: COMM 104 or prior video journalism experience (contact instructor); Journalism MA student; or instructor's consent.
Last offered: Winter 2019

COMM 272: Media Psychology (COMM 172)

(Graduate students register for COMM 272.) The literature related to psychological processing and the effects of media. Topics: unconscious processing; picture perception; attention and memory; emotion; the physiology of processing media; person perception; pornography; consumer behavior; advanced film and television systems; and differences among reading, watching, and listening.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Reeves, B. (PI)
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