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11 - 20 of 127 results for: COMM

COMM 113S: Digital Media and Behavior

This course will explore how self-representation, interface design, and media affordances affect both online and offline behavior. Readings and lectures will introduce students to theories in psychology, communication, and human-computer interaction. Students will learn about media affordances, trends in media consumption, and think about the societal implications of having mediated identities. The second half of the course will focus on how media consumption and self-representation, coupled with interface design, affect attitudes and offline behavior. Topics include deception, social interactions, activism, empathy, and prosocial behaviors within the context of social networks, gaming, augmented and virtual reality. The course will include a combination of written assignments, labs, a group project, and a tour of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

COMM 116: Journalism Law (COMM 216)

(Graduate students register for 216.) Laws and regulation impacting journalists. Topics include libel, privacy, news gathering, protection sources, fair trial and free press, theories of the First Amendment, and broadcast regulation. Prerequisite: Journalism M.A. student or advanced Communication major.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Wheaton, J. (PI)

COMM 120W: Digital Media in Society (AMSTUD 120, COMM 220)

Contemporary debates concerning the social and cultural impact of digital media. Topics include the historical origins of digital media, cultural contexts of their development and use, and influence of digital media on conceptions of self, community, and state. Priority to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

COMM 121: Behavior and Social Media

This course examines behavioral approaches to understanding social media. The course will begin by discussing the design factors that shape behavior online, considering research in human-computer interaction that reflects and reveals communication practices and contexts. Next, the course will examine the psychological aspects of computer-mediated communication and virtual collaboration, including impression formation and management, deception, audience and social networks. Finally, the course will explore the ways in which human behavior is situated inside of social and institutional structures and cultural formations; and with that in mind, it will examine the complex interactions between behavior, society, and information technology.
Last offered: Spring 2016

COMM 124: Lies, Trust, and Tech (COMM 224)

Deception is one of the most significant and pervasive social phenomena of our age. Lies range from the trivial to the very serious, including deception between friends and family, in the workplace, and in security and intelligence contexts. At the same time, information and communication technologies have pervaded almost all aspects of human communication, from everyday technologies that support interpersonal interactions to, such as email and instant messaging, to more sophisticated systems that support organization-level interactions. Given the prevalence of both deception and communication technology in our personal and professional lives, an important set of questions have recently emerged about how humans adapt their deceptive practices to new communication and information technologies, including how communication technology affects the practice of lying and the detection of deception, and whether technology can be used to identify deception.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 125: Perspectives on American Journalism (AMSTUD 125, COMM 225)

An examination of American journalism, focusing on how news is produced, distributed, and financially supported. Emphasis on current media controversies and puzzles, and on designing innovations in discovering and telling stories. (Graduate students register for COMM 225.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

COMM 127X: The Ethics of Anonymity (CSRE 127X, ETHICSOC 2)

When is it ethical to conceal your identity or to permit another to remain anonymous? What is the value to remaining unknown, and what might be the cost? Does anonymity free you to think, act, or be in ways you wouldn't otherwise? What else might it allow or constrain? How might your answers differ depending on the circumstances or context? In this one-unit lunchtime seminar, guest speakers will discuss topics that might include: anonymous sources in journalism; anonymity online; the history of anonymous authorship and attribution; whistleblowers and confidential informants; anonymous egg or sperm donors and birth parents; anonymity vs. confidentiality for research participants; anonymity and art; technology and anonymity.
Last offered: Winter 2016

COMM 130N: The idea of a free press

Preference to freshmen. An examination of the meaning of freedom of the press, tied to but not bound by various Supreme Court rulings on the scope and purpose of the First Amendment's speech and press clauses. Discussions will include a look at the recent and rapid computerization of communication and what it portends for the future of a free press.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Glasser, T. (PI)

COMM 131: Media Ethics and Responsibility (COMM 231)

(Graduate students register for COMM 231.) The development of professionalism among American journalists, emphasizing the emergence of objectivity as a professional and the epistemological norm. An applied ethics course where questions of power, freedom, and truth autonomy are treated normatively so as to foster critical thinking about the origins and implications of commonly accepted standards of responsible journalism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER

COMM 133: Need to Know: The Tension between a Free Press and National Security Decision Making (COMM 233)

This seminar examines the dynamic interaction at the highest levels of government and the media when news coverage of secret national security policy and operations impinges on United States defense, diplomatic and intelligence activities and decision making and affects the American political system. Prime examples: intelligence information about Russian hacking operations during the 2016 presidential election campaign, the unverified intelligence dossier on Donald Trump's Russian connections, the torrent of secret NSA programs disclosed by Edward Snowden. Students explore attitudes, practices, and actions by the media and the government through a series of case studies and simulations. Former editors, reporters, and government officials appear as guest speakers, including Michael Hayden, former director of the NSA and CIA. The goal of the course is to inform students about the vital but often fraught relationship between a free press and the government in a democratic society. For advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Application for enrollment required. The instructor is a former Washington bureau chief of The New York Times. Email Alexa Philippou (aphil723@stanford.edu) to request an application. Completed applications are due by 6pm (pacific) on March 25, 2018. Early applications welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Taubman, P. (PI)
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