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41 - 50 of 90 results for: CME

CME 251: The Shape of Data: Geometric and Topological Data Analysis (CS 233)

Mathematical computational tools for the analysis of data with geometric content, such images, videos, 3D scans, GPS traces -- as well as for other data embedded into geometric spaces. Global and local geometry descriptors allowing for various kinds of invariances. The rudiments of computational topology and persistent homology on sampled spaces. Clustering and other unsupervised techniques. Spectral methods for geometric data analysis. Non-linear dimensionality reduction. Alignment, matching, and map computation between geometric data sets. Function spaces and functional maps.Networks of data sets and joint analysis for segmentation and labeling. The emergence of abstractions or concepts from data. Prerequisites: discrete algorithms at the level of 161; linear algebra at the level of CM103.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 252: Introduction to Optimization

This course introduces mathematical optimization and modeling, with a focus on convex optimization. Topics include: varieties of mathematical optimization, convexity of functions and sets, convex optimization modeling with CVXPY, gradient descent and basic distributed optimization, in-depth examples from machine learning, statistics and other fields and applications of bi-convexity and non-convex gradient descent.nRecommended prerequisite: familiarity with linear algebra, differential multivariable calculus, and basic probability and statistics. Experience with Python will be helpful, but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Friend, A. (PI)

CME 253: Introduction to GPU Computing and CUDA

Covers the fundamentals of accelerating applications with GPUs (Graphics Processing Units); GPU programming with CUDA and OpenACC, debugging, thrust/CUB, profiling, optimization, debugging, and other CUDA tools. Libraries to easily accelerate compute code will be presented and deployment on larger systems will be addressed, including multi-GPU environments. Several practical examples will be detailed, including deep learning. Pre-requiste: knowledge of C/C++ at the level of CME211 or CS106b.
Terms: given next year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CME 257: Advanced Topics in Scientific Computing with Julia

This short course runs from the 2nd to the 5th week of the quarter. This course will rapidly introduce students to the new Julia language, with the goal of giving students the knowledge and experience necessary to begin contributing to the language and package ecosystem while using Julia for their own scientific computing needs. The course will begin with learning the basics of Julia with an emphasis on its object-oriented features, and then introduce students to Github and package development. Additional topics include: common packages, interfacing with C shared object libraries, and Julia's core linear algebra implementation. Lectures will be interactive, with an emphasis on collaboration and learning by example. Prerequisites: Data structures at the level of CS106B, experience with one or more scientific computing languages (e.g. Python, Matlab, or R), and some familiarity with C/C++ and the Unix shell. No prior experience with Julia or Github is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Nelson, B. (PI)

CME 263: Introduction to Linear Dynamical Systems (EE 263)

Applied linear algebra and linear dynamical systems with applications to circuits, signal processing, communications, and control systems. Topics: least-squares approximations of over-determined equations, and least-norm solutions of underdetermined equations. Symmetric matrices, matrix norm, and singular-value decomposition. Eigenvalues, left and right eigenvectors, with dynamical interpretation. Matrix exponential, stability, and asymptotic behavior. Multi-input/multi-output systems, impulse and step matrices; convolution and transfer-matrix descriptions. Control, reachability, and state transfer; observability and least-squares state estimation. Prerequisites: linear algebra and matrices as in MATH104; differential equations and Laplace transforms as in EE102B.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOE 279, BIOMEDIN 279, BIOPHYS 279, CS 279)

Computational approaches to understanding the three-dimensional spatial organization of biological systems and how that organization evolves over time. The course will cover cutting-edge research in both physics-based simulations and computational analysis of experimental data, at scales ranging from individual molecules to multiple cells. Prerequisites: elementary programming background (106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 285: Computational Modeling in the Cardiovascular System (BIOE 285)

This course introduces computational modeling methods for cardiovascular blood flow and physiology. Topics in this course include analytical and computational methods for solutions of flow in deformable vessels, one-dimensional equations of blood flow, cardiovascular anatomy, lumped parameter models, vascular trees, scaling laws, biomechanics of the circulatory system, and 3D patient specific modeling with finite elements; course will provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of adult and congenital cardiovascular diseases and review recent research in the literature in a journal club format. Students will use SimVascular software to do clinically-oriented projects in patient specific blood flow simulations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Marsden, A. (PI)

CME 291: Master's Research

Students require faculty sponsor. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 292: Advanced MATLAB for Scientific Computing

Short course running first four weeks of the quarter (8 lectures) with interactive lectures and application based assignment. Students will be introduced to advanced MATLAB features, syntaxes, and toolboxes not traditionally found in introductory courses. Material will be reinforced with in-class examples, demos, and homework assignment involving topics from scientific computing. MATLAB topics will be drawn from: advanced graphics (2D/3D plotting, graphics handles, publication quality graphics, animation), MATLAB tools (debugger, profiler), code optimization (vectorization, memory management), object-oriented programming, compiled MATLAB (MEX files and MATLAB coder), interfacing with external programs, toolboxes (optimization, parallel computing, symbolic math, PDEs). Scientific computing topics will include: numerical linear algebra, numerical optimization, ODEs, and PDEs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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