2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 40 results for: CLASSICS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CLASSICS 2G: Beginning Greek

(Formerly CLASSGRK 2.) Continuation of CLASSICS 1G. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: McCall, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 2L: Beginning Latin

(Formerly CLASSLAT 2.) Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. Prerequisite: CLASSICS 1L or equivalent placement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Klopacz, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 6G: Biblical Greek (JEWISHST 5, RELIGST 171A)

(Formerly CLASSGRK 5.) This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. No previous knowledge of Greek required. If demand is high for a second term, an additional quarter will be offered in the Spring.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ten-Hove, E. (PI)

CLASSICS 12G: Intermediate Greek: Euripides' Medea

(Formerly CLASSGRK 102.) The Medea of Euripides was first performed in 431 BCE at the Great Dionysia of Athens, where it won last place. Euripides¿ vision of the Colchian princess as a spurned spouse and a murderous mother, however, would triumph in the imaginations of Western readers for millennia. In this class, we will study the script and stagecraft of the Medea in the original Greek in order to better appreciate how the artistry of the tragic poet made Medea a source of both admiration and terror. We will read selections from Medea and relevant secondary readings on Greek tragedy and the reception of Euripides after the fifth century. Our primary objective in this class is to achieve fluid reading ability with Euripides¿ vocabulary, syntax, and meter. Secondary goals include revisiting grammar concepts and learning about the historical contexts surrounding Medea¿s production. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 12L: Intermediate Latin: Petronius and Martial

(Formerly CLASSLAT 102.) Selections from Petronius "Satyrica" and Martial's epigrams. Our primary goal will be to read these texts in their original Latin with attention to the idiosyncrasies of each author's language and style. We will discuss the literary qualities of the works as well as the cultural contexts in which Petronius and Martial wrote. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Weiss, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 17N: To Die For: Antigone and Political Dissent (TAPS 12N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 6N.) Preference to freshmen. Tensions inherent in the democracy of ancient Athens; how the character of Antigone emerges in later drama, film, and political thought as a figure of resistance against illegitimate authority; and her relevance to contemporary struggles for women's and workers' rights and national liberation. Readings and screenings include versions of Antigone by Sophocles, Anouilh, Brecht, Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Paulin, Glowacki, Gurney, and von Trotta.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rehm, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 24N: What is a Map?

Exploration of the nature of maps via an overview of premodern mapping practices, combining theory and history of maps. Hands-on research involving Stanford's rare and historical maps, and chance to create own maps.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Parker, G. (PI)

CLASSICS 31: Greek Mythology

(Formerly CLASSGEN 18.) The heroic and divine in the literature, mythology, and culture of archaic Greece. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individuals and society. Illustrated lectures. Readings in translation of Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, and the poets of lyric and tragedy. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required during regular academic quarters (Aut, Win, Spr)
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 42: Philosophy and Literature (COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track. Majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature, with particular focus on the question of value: what, if anything, does engagement with literary works do for our lives? Issues include aesthetic self-fashioning, the paradox of tragedy, the paradox of caring, the truth-value of fiction, metaphor, authorship, irony, make-believe, expression, edification, clarification, and training. Readings are drawn from literature and film, philosophical theories of art, and stylistically interesting works of philosophy. Authors may include Sophocles, Chaucer, Dickinson, Proust, Woolf, Borges, Beckett, Kundera, Charlie Kaufman; Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas; Plato, Montaigne, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 43: Exploring the New Testament (RELIGST 86)

The New Testament is many things to many people. Around the globe, it is and has been for two millennia a source of culture, law, and faith. It has been used both to undergird battles for civil rights and to fight against them. It has been used both to justify wars and to argue that all war is unjust. Yet, many people haven¿t read the New Testament and still more haven¿t looked at it from historical, sociological, comparative and literary frameworks. This course will provide you the opportunity to read the New Testament and to study it closely. We will ask questions of the New Testament about the early Jesus movement, how it fits into its historical context and how it developed. We will look at the range of opinions and views about Jesus present in this literature. We will explore the different genres used by early Christians. We will examine how this set of Early Christian texts came to be considered the canon.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints