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1 - 10 of 28 results for: CLASSICS ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CLASSICS 1G: Beginning Greek

(Formerly CLASSGRK 1.) No knowledge of Greek is assumed. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: McCall, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 1L: Beginning Latin

(Formerly CLASSLAT 1.) Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. No previous knowledge of Latin is assumed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language
Instructors: Klopacz, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 11G: Intermediate Greek: Prose

(Formerly CLASSGRK 101.) Transition to reading narrative Grammar review and vocabulary-building.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Driscoll, D. (PI)

CLASSICS 11L: Intermediate Latin: Introduction to Literature

(Formerly CLASSLAT 101.) Phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Readings in prose and poetry. Analysis of literary language, including rhythm, meter, word order, narrative, and figures of speech.May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Klopacz, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 26N: The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall (HISTORY 11N)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Explore themes on the Roman Empire and its decline from the 1st through the 5th centuries C.E.. What was the political and military glue that held this diverse, multi-ethnic empire together? What were the bases of wealth and how was it distributed? What were the possibilities and limits of economic growth? How integrated was it in culture and religion? What were the causes and consequences of the conversion to Christianity? Why did the Empire fall in the West? How suitable is the analogy of the U.S. in the 21st century?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:IHUM-3, WAY-SI
Instructors: Saller, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 37: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, The Ancient World (DLCL 11)

This course will journey through ancient literature from Homer to St. Augustine; it will introduce participants to some of its fascinating features and big ideas; and it will reflect on questions such as: What is a good life, a good society? Who is in and who is out and why? What is the meaning of honor, and should it be embraced or feared? Where does human subjectivity fit into a world of matter, cause and effect? When is rebellion justified? What happens when a way of life or thought is upended? Do we have any duties to the past?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 40: Greek Philosophy (PHIL 100)

We shall cover the major developments in Greek philosophical thought, focusing on Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic schools (the Epicureans, the Stoics, and the Skeptics). Topics include epistemology, metaphysics, psychology, ethics and political theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 76: Global History: The Ancient World (HISTORY 1A)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, and hierarchy, emphasizing the three great turning points in early history: the evolution of modern humans, the agricultural revolution, and the rise of the state.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 82: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 88: Origins of History in Greece and Rome (HISTORY 114)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 117.) The beginnings and development of historical writing in the ancient world. Emphasis on major classical historians and various models of history they invented, from local to imperial, military, cultural, biographical, world history and church history. Focus on themes of power, war, loss, growth and decline, as put by the ancients into historical narrative forms and probed by way of historical questioning and explanation. Attention to how these models resonate still today. Readings in translation: Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, Livy and others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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