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61 - 70 of 193 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 102G: Advanced Greek: Aristophanes

Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Martin, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 102L: Advanced Latin: Ovid (CLASSICS 209L)

In his Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto, stemming from his banishment to the Black Sea coast in 8 CE, Ovid ostensibly addresses his wife, friends and patrons back in Rome, longing for the chance to return. These 'Sadnesses' and 'Letters from Pontus' use the same meter as his love poems, namely elegiac couplets, but by contrast they sound a nostalgic note. Ovid complains bitterly about conditions in his new location, so far from his beloved city of Rome. In reading a rich sample of these exile poems we'll assess the poet's self-representation, his apparent clash of art and politics, and more generally the nature of literary exile and cultural landscapes. As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Sample reading: Ovid, Epistulae ex Ponto book 1 (ed. Garth Tissol, 2014).As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Parker, G. (PI)

CLASSICS 103G: Advanced Greek: Ancient Scientific Writing

Classics majors and minors must take for a letter grade and may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Netz, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 103L: Advanced Latin: Bad Emperors: Tacitus and Suetonius on Nero

Why was Nero remembered as a 'bad' emperor? Tacitus and Suetonius, who wrote the foremost histories of his life, described Nero's abuses and corruption in great detail. But what is the line between gossip and history? In this class, we will examine accounts of Nero's life as a way to understand the early imperial period and the later historians who chronicled it. We will read Suetonius's Life of Nero and then Tacitus Annals 14. In doing so, we will examine key questions of how Roman historians understood history-writing, political authority, power, liberty, gender roles, and morality. Select secondary readings will help shed light on whether portrayals of Nero's reign are fair based on current scholarly arguments. As context, we will discuss the roles of powerful women (Livia, Drusilla, Messalina, and Agrippina) as well as the post-Augustan Julio-Claudians (the other 'bad emperors'). If time permits, we will examine additional short readings from other sources such as Seneca's Apocoloc more »
Why was Nero remembered as a 'bad' emperor? Tacitus and Suetonius, who wrote the foremost histories of his life, described Nero's abuses and corruption in great detail. But what is the line between gossip and history? In this class, we will examine accounts of Nero's life as a way to understand the early imperial period and the later historians who chronicled it. We will read Suetonius's Life of Nero and then Tacitus Annals 14. In doing so, we will examine key questions of how Roman historians understood history-writing, political authority, power, liberty, gender roles, and morality. Select secondary readings will help shed light on whether portrayals of Nero's reign are fair based on current scholarly arguments. As context, we will discuss the roles of powerful women (Livia, Drusilla, Messalina, and Agrippina) as well as the post-Augustan Julio-Claudians (the other 'bad emperors'). If time permits, we will examine additional short readings from other sources such as Seneca's Apocolocyntosis. Readings will be in the original Latin. We will also examine the portrayal of emperors in popular media, particularly I, Claudius. As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Mallon, K. (PI)

CLASSICS 104A: Latin Syntax (CLASSICS 204A)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. Begins Autumn Quarter and continues through the fifth week of Winter Quarter. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 104B: Latin Syntax (CLASSICS 204B)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. Began with 104A/204A in Autumn Quarter and continues through the fifth week of Winter Quarter. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204B.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 105A: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 205A)

Review of Greek grammar and instruction in Greek prose composition skills. Begins sixth week of Winter Quarter and continues through Spring Quarter. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Greek. First-year graduate students register for 205A/B.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Stephens, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 105B: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 205B)

Review of Greek grammar and instruction in Greek prose composition skills. Begins sixth week of Winter Quarter and continues through Spring Quarter. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Greek. First-year graduate students register for 205A/B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Stephens, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 110: Gods and Humans in Greek Philosophical Thought (CLASSICS 310)

We will examine several key aspects of Greek religion: the Greek conception of the gods; how humans got messages from the gods through oracles, divination, and epiphanies; and the festival of the Eleusinian Mysteries. We will read fragments of Heraclitus and Parmenides, and Plato¿ Apology, Republic 6-7, and Phaedrus to investigate these philosophers¿ new conceptions of gods and humans. What kinds of divinities did the philosophers conceive of? How could a human achieve divine wisdom? To what extent did the philosophers use traditional religious ideas? nnAdvanced undergrads may register
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5

CLASSICS 112: Introduction to Greek Tragedy: Gods, Heroes, Fate, and Justice (TAPS 167)

Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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