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51 - 60 of 196 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 60: Reading Aristotle's Ethics: Happiness and the Virtues of Character (SLE 60)

How should I live? What should I do to live a happy life? And what does happiness have to do with ethics? What might the best human life look like? What kind of friendships contribute to happiness--and to justice? In the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle offers us a vision of human flourishing that has nurtured thinkers, secular and religious, for thousands of years and continues to shape political and ethical thinking. In this study group we read and reflect upon the first few books of the Ethics, on happiness and the virtues of character, slowly and carefully. Each week you will be expected to read a short, but dense, section of the Ethics, and to share responsibility for asking questions.
Last offered: Winter 2020

CLASSICS 61: Reading Aristotle's Ethics, Part 2 (SLE 61)

In this course we continue our reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, moving from the individual moral virtues to his formative discussion of justice and equity. We then move on to Aristotle's development of the intellectual virtues and their relation to ethics. Much of our attention will be focused on friendship, without which, as Aristotle says, no one would wish to live, and which is central to virtue and happiness. At the same time we strive to develop our capacity for friendship in ourselves, using Aristotle's discussion to help us reflect on our own lives.
Last offered: Spring 2020

CLASSICS 76: Global History: The Ancient World (HISTORY 1A)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, hierarchy, and large-scale belief systems.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Scheidel, W. (PI)

CLASSICS 81: Ancient Empires: Near East (HISTORY 117)

Why do imperialists conquer people? Why do some people resist while others collaborate? This course tries to answer these questions by looking at some of the world's earliest empires. The main focus is on the expansion of the Assyrian and Persian Empires between 900 and 300 BC and the consequences for the ancient Jews, Egyptians, and Greeks. The main readings come from the Bible, Herodotus, and Assyrian and Persian royal inscriptions, and the course combines historical and archaeological data with social scientific approaches. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CLASSICS 82: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

This course traces the emergence and development of the distinctive cultural world of the ancient Egyptians over nearly 4,000 years. Through archaeological and textual evidence, we will investigate the social structures, religious beliefs, and expressive traditions that framed life and death in this extraordinary region. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bartos, N. (PI)

CLASSICS 83: The Greeks (HISTORY 101)

250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 84: The Romans (HISTORY 102A)

How did a tiny village create a huge empire and shape the world, and why did it fail? Roman history, imperialism, politics, social life, economic growth, and religious change. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on Coursework.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 88: Origins of History in Greece and Rome (HISTORY 114)

What¿s the history of `History¿? The first ancient historians wrote about commoners and kings, conquest and power¿those who had it, those who wanted it, those without it. Their powerful ways of recounting the past still resonate today and can be harnessed to tell new stories. We will look at how ancients like Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, and Livy turned stories about the past into compelling narratives of loss, growth and decline¿inventing ¿History¿ as we know it. All readings in English.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 92: Introduction to Greek Art and Archaeology (ARCHLGY 92)

This course will introduce students to the art and archaeology of Greece and the Greek world from the Neolithic through Early Roman periods. By integrating both historical and current approaches to the archaeology of Greece, this course aims to supplement the typical chronological narrative of the development of Greek material culture with various thematic explorations (e.g. nationalism in archaeology, social complexity, postcolonial approaches), as well as to critically evaluate mechanisms of interpretation in Greek archaeology over time.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

CLASSICS 93: Pots, People, and Press: Greek Archaeology in the Media (ARCHLGY 83)

Archaeological discovery has long captured the popular imagination, and the media undoubtedly plays a crucial role in this phenomenon. In the case of Greek archaeology, much of this imagination has been intertwined with the legacies of ancient Greek culture(s) in the construction of modern identities and ideologies, including the concept of ¿Western Civilization.¿ This course explores the intersections between academic research, media narratives, and the social, political, and cultural context of Greek archaeology from the 19th century to the present. Through a diachronic range of case studies, we will engage with a selection of media accounts and representations, alongside scholarly work and commentaries. In doing so, the class will more broadly examine issues surrounding archaeological evidence and interpretation, narrative formation, the reception and appropriation of the past, conceptualizations of race and ethnicity, nationalism and archaeology, and cultural heritage management. No prior knowledge of Greek archaeology is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Duray, A. (PI)
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