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151 - 160 of 197 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 280: Introduction to Coptic I (CLASSICS 180)

For graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Introductory grammar of Sahidic Coptic. Recommended: knowledge of other ancient languages. Enrollment by permission of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

CLASSICS 297: Dissertation Proposal Preparation

This course is to be taken twice during the third year of the Classics PhD program. It takes the form of a tutorial based on weekly meetings, leading to the writing of the dissertation prospectus. To register, a student obtain permission from the prospective faculty advisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

CLASSICS 298: Directed Reading in Classics (Graduate Students)

This course is offered for students requiring specialized training in an area not covered by existing courses. To register, a student must obtain permission from the Classics Department and the faculty member who is willing to supervise the reading. This course can be repeated for credit, not to exceed 20 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit (up to 20 units total)

CLASSICS 301: Gateways to Classics

(Formerly CLASSGEN 300A.) Focus on skills, methodologies and approaches in the study of Classics topics, with attention both to histories of the disciplines and to new developments. Required for first-year Classics graduate students.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

CLASSICS 302: Workshop on Teaching in Classics

Introduction to pedagogical theories and techniques relevant to careers as Classics instructors. Classics faculty and advanced graduate students will lead sessions on language instruction, class discussions, assignments and feedback, and course design. Participants will read selections from modern scholarship on teaching and learning and engage in hands-on exercises.
Last offered: Spring 2017

CLASSICS 304: Developing a Classics Dissertation Prospectus

This workshop concentrates on the development process of writing a successful dissertation proposal and clarifies expectations of the defense process. Includes peer reviews of draft proposals with an aim to present provisional proposals by the end of term. Highly recommended for current third-year Classics Ph.D. students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3
Instructors: Trimble, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 311: The Poetics of the Odyssey

An intensive study of the entire poem, with particular attention given to problems of narrative construction, characterization, diction, and themes. Basic knowledge of Homeric language and versemaking is a prerequisite. Reading will cover about 500 lines of Greek each week in addition to secondary readings (several book chapters or articles).
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Martin, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 315: Aristotle and the Object of Mathematical Reasoning (PHIL 318)

The concept of definition plays a central role in Aristotle's treatment of both philosophical and scientific inquiry, as well as explanation. A definition is an account of what something is, and some definitions are used to guide causal inquiry whereas others function as explanatory starting points. In this course we will examine texts from his logic, natural science and metaphysics in order to see what the different kinds of definition are, how they obtained, and how they are capture the nature or essence of a definable object. Particular attention will be given to the role of matter in the definition of the form of a natural substance, state, process or activity. For instance, what role does a specification of physiological processes play in the definitions of emotions such as anger? No knowledge of Greek is required. May be repeat for credit.
| Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)

CLASSICS 318: Aristophanes: Comedy, and Democracy

Intensive study of three plays in Greek (Knights, Peace, Ecclesiazusae) and the rest of the corpus in English, with reference to formal features and a focus on how Old Comedy related to the democratic practices of Athens.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

CLASSICS 328: Augustine on Memory, Time, and the Self

(Formerly CLASSGEN 336.) This course examines Augustine's "Confessions" as an autobiographical discourse. It investigates his theories of memory and of time and address different theories of the "self." How does memory and the passing of time affect the notion of the self? Does Augustine's "subjective" theory of time offer an identifiable self? Is the self constructed by narratives? We will locate these issues in their cultural context by investigating Christian and pagan discourses and practices in Late Antiquity.
Last offered: Spring 2016
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