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121 - 130 of 183 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 204B: Latin Syntax II (CLASSICS 104B)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204B.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 205A: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 105A)

The goal of this course is to provide a thorough review of Greek syntax, reinforced by reading selected short passages of Attic Greek in some detail, in order to develop a much greater command of the language and to increase reading skills as well as an understanding of the stylistic features of the major prose genres.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Stephens, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 206A: The Semantics of Grammar I

Some theoretical linguistics for Classics students, particularly Latin teachers. Concentrates on the meaning of the inflectional categories. 206A: Sets and functions, Tense, Aspect, Argument Structure, Location. 206B: Quantification, Plurality, Modification, Negation, Modality
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 206B: The Semantics of Grammar II

Some theoretical linguistics for Classics students, particularly Latin teachers. Concentrates on the meaning of the inflectional categories. 206A: Sets and functions, Tense, Aspect, Argument Structure, Location. 206B: Quantification, Plurality, Modification, Negation, Modality
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 207L: The Pastoral in Post-Classical Literature 

For modern readers, the words pastoral and bucolic evoke picturesque scenes of pastureland and flocks of sheep an Arcadian paradise first envisaged by the classical poets Theocritus and Virgil. This weekly reading group traces the long legacy of pastoral poetry in post-classical Latin literature, including the works of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Sannazaro, and Milton. Through the songs of their shepherds, we will rediscover the pastoral landscape as a site of intergenerational conflict between poets from antiquity to the Renaissance. All readings will be done in the original Latin. Prerequisite: at least one full year of Latin or permission of instructor. Course may be taken independently or as an optional extra weekly session of CLASSICS 102L Advanced Latin: Virgil's Eclogues and Georgics (in the latter case, please register for CLASSICS 102L).
Last offered: Winter 2016

CLASSICS 208L: Latin 400-1700 CE (CLASSICS 6L, RELIGST 173X)

Readings in later Latin, drawing on the vast bodies of texts from the late antique, medieval and early modern periods. Each week students will prepare selections in advance of class meetings; class time will be devoted to translation and discussion. Students taking this course will gain exposure to a wide range of later Latin texts; hone translation skills; and develop an awareness of the grammatical and stylistic features of post-classical Latin. The course is aimed both at classical Latinists seeking to broaden their reading experience and at medievalists and early modernists seeking to consolidate their Latin language skills. May be repeat for credit.nnPrior experience in Latin is required, preferably CLASSICS 11L. Equivalent accepted. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Does not fulfill the language requirement in Classical Studies track.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 209L: Advanced Latin: Early Latin (CLASSICS 102L)

Most of the literature that we read in Latin is from a relatively late period of the language's history. However, Latin-speaking people wrote sophisticated texts hundreds of years before Cicero and Caesar, although much of this early writing has been lost to history. But not all! In this class we will explore the rich remains of Early Latin, with readings that include archaic inscriptions, early Latin prose from Cato the Elder, selections from the comedies of Plautus and Terence, and fragments from Androniucs, Naevius, and Ennius, the first known writers of Latin epic poetry. In parallel, we will also explore the history of the Latin language during this early period, emphasizing the historical developments that distinguish Early Latin from Classical Latin, as well as the historical reasons so much early Latin writing was not preserved. Students should be able to read Latin at an Intermediate-to-Advanced level, but no experience with linguistics, Early Latin, or Roman History is expected or required. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
| Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 210: Latin Prose Composition

Latin Prose Composition pursues two goals: to help students consolidate their knowledge of Latin syntax by way of translating English sentences and (short) passages into Ciceronian Latin; and to help them appreciate differences in style by way of imitating the styles of different authors and periods, working within various subject-areas and genres. To these ends we will study selected grammatical problems, read (longer) passages in Latin (for the first half of the term, this reading will largely consist of Cicero¿s Pro Marcello), reserving particular attention for stylistics. Students will have to submit written translations from English into Latin every week; during the term¿s final third, they should expect to be working on longer compositions too (around 150 words in length).
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Krebs, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 212: Introduction to Latin Epigraphy

(Formerly CLASSGEN 219.) How to engage with epigraphic evidence through translation and contextualization of inscriptions. The materiality of inscriptions, geographical variation, and current scholarly debates in scholarship. How to use this evidence in research.
Last offered: Winter 2017

CLASSICS 213: Proseminar: Documentary Papyrology

The focus will be on documentary papyrology. Students will be introduced to the basics of the discipline.
Last offered: Autumn 2018
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