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111 - 120 of 194 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 197: Aristotle's Logic (PHIL 347)

In this seminar we read through Aristotle's Prior Analytics, paying close attention to the relation between Aristotle's logic to Greek mathematics, and to its place within Aristotle's overall philosophy. Knowledge of Greek is not required. Open to advanced undergraduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020

CLASSICS 198: Directed Readings (Undergraduate)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 160.) May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 199: Undergraduate Thesis: Senior Research

(Formerly CLASSGEN 199.) May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 200G: Special Topics: Greek Magic Texts

This is a graduate level survey of magic and magic practices in Greek literary sources. We will read primary sources discussing magic, witchcraft, erotic spells, and ghosts from Herodotus through Lucian.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 201G: Survey of Greek Literature: Archaic Greek

Required two-year sequence focusing on the origins, development, and interaction of Greek and Latin literature, history, and philosophy. Greek and Latin material taught in alternate years.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

CLASSICS 201L: Latin Core I: Catiline

In-depth reading (in selection or parts) of Cicero's Catilinarians, Pro Caelio, letters, the Rhetorica ad Herennium, and Sallust's Bellum Catilinae. In class we'll translate and analyze these texts, reviewing grammatical issues as needed and concentrating on elements of style. One consistent conceptual interest will be in the persona of Catiline. The philological commentaries by A.R. Dyck (In Cat.), R.G. Austin (Pro Cael.), and J.T. Ramsey (BC) will be our guides in our detailed reading. Participants will become familiar with these key literary works, their respective genres, and the significance of rhetoric; they will deepen their understanding of different prose styles; and they will sharpen their Latin translation skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Krebs, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 201LA: Survey of Latin Literature: Special Topics

One-year sequence focusing on the origins, development, and interaction of Latin literature, history, and philosophy. Greek and Latin material taught in alternate years. Focus is on translation, textual criticism, genre, the role of Greece in shaping Roman literature, and oral versus written discourse.
Last offered: Spring 2018

CLASSICS 202G: Survey of Greek Literature: Classical Greek

Required two-year sequence focusing on the origins, development, and interaction of Greek and Latin literature, history, and philosophy. Greek and Latin material taught in alternate years.
Last offered: Winter 2020

CLASSICS 202GB: Survey of Greek Literature: Special Topics

Required two-year sequence focusing on the origins, development, and interaction of Greek and Latin literature, history, and philosophy. Greek and Latin material taught in alternate years.
Last offered: Winter 2018

CLASSICS 202L: Latin Core II: Age of Nero

In-depth reading of a major poet or a themed selection of poetry, e.g. Vergil, Horace or Ovid. Courses may be theme-based, e.g. Aeneas in Vergil and Ovid, or genre-based, combining representative selections of epic, elegy or satire from various authors. Goals will be to acquire detailed knowledge of selected literary works and genres, become familiar with key scholarly debates, and sharpen translation skills by focused reading in the same or similar styles. Students will be responsible for an agreed amount of Latin reading each week, with the intention that less proficient readers especially will ramp up over the course of the term towards increased fluency. Most class time should be devoted to Latin translation and stylistic analysis; short tests, examinations and written assignments will reflect these goals. Assessment will be in the form of two midterms plus a final examination, with a view to the Reading List examination.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Parker, G. (PI)
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