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61 - 70 of 185 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 104A: Latin Syntax (CLASSICS 204A)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. Begins Autumn Quarter and continues through the fifth week of Winter Quarter. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 104B: Latin Syntax (CLASSICS 204B)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. Began with 104A/204A in Autumn Quarter and continues through the fifth week of Winter Quarter. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204B.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 105A: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 205A)

Review of Greek grammar and instruction in Greek prose composition skills. Begins sixth week of Winter Quarter and continues through Spring Quarter. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Greek. First-year graduate students register for 205A/B.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Recht, T. (PI)

CLASSICS 105B: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 205B)

Review of Greek grammar and instruction in Greek prose composition skills. Begins sixth week of Winter Quarter and continues through Spring Quarter. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Greek. First-year graduate students register for 205A/B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Recht, T. (PI)

CLASSICS 110: Gods and Humans in Greek Philosophical Thought (CLASSICS 310)

How did the Greeks conceive of the gods and divine wisdom? How did the gods communicate with humans in direct epiphanies and through oracles and divination? We will read the poetic fragments of Heraclitus and Parmenides, and several dialogues of Plato (Symposium, Republic, Phaedrus) to investigate their new conceptions of gods and humans. What kinds of divinities did the philosophers create? How could humans achieve divine wisdom? To what extent did the philosophers use traditional religious ideas? To address these questions, we will examine Greek representations of the gods in poetic texts and in the visual arts. We will also study the Orphic and Eleusinian mystery religions. nAdvanced undergrads may register
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 112: Introduction to Greek Tragedy: Gods, Heroes, Fate, and Justice (TAPS 167)

Gods and heroes, fate and free choice, gender conflict, the justice or injustice of the universe: these are just some of the fundamental human issues that we will explore in about ten of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Slabon, T. (TA)

CLASSICS 115: Mapping the Grand Tour: Digital Methods for Historical Data (ENGLISH 115, HISTORY 238C, ITALIAN 115)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can digital approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior experience necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 116: Human Rights in Comparative and Historical Perspective (ETHICSOC 106, HUMRTS 106)

This course examines core human rights issues and concepts from a comparative and historical perspective. In the beginning part of the course we will focus on current debates about the universality of human rights norms, considering the foundation of the international human rights regime and claims that it is a product of western colonialism, imperialism, or hegemony. We will then discuss a series of issues where the debates about universality are particularly acute: gender inequality and discrimination, sexual violence, child marriage and forced marriage more generally, and other related topics. We will also consider the way in which issues of gender-based violence arise in the context of internal and international conflicts.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 118: Slavery, human trafficking, and the moral order: ancient and modern (CLASSICS 218, HUMRTS 109)

Slavery and trafficking in persons in the Greco-Roman world were legal and ubiquitous; today slavery is illegal in most states and regarded as a grave violation of human rights and as a crime against humanity under international law. In recent trends, human trafficking has been re-conceptualized as a form of "modern day slavery. " Despite more than a century since the success of the abolition movement, slavery and trafficking continue in the 21st century on a global scale. The only book for the course is: Peter Garnsey, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, Cambridge University Press
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 123: Ancient Medicine

Contemporary medical practice traces its origins to the creation of scientific medicine by Greek doctors such as Hippocrates and Galen. Is this something of which modern medicine can be proud? The scientific achievements and ethical limitations of ancient medicine when scientific medicine was no more than another form of alternative medicine. Scientific medicine competed in a marketplace of ideas where the boundaries between scientific and social aspects of medicine were difficult to draw.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Netz, R. (PI)
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