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41 - 50 of 185 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 44: Epic! Life, death, and glory in the Iliad and Odyssey

The two epics attributed to the ancient Greek poet Homer enshrine a vivid world of experience centered on the deeds and misdeeds of warriors and divinities, kings and queens, in the last days and aftermath of the Trojan War. The course examines these remarkable poems in detail, with attention to their political, social, historical and artistic contexts, as well as to their reception in art, literature, film and music over the last two millennia. No prior knowledge of Homer or Greek literature necessary.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2018 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 52: Introduction to Roman Archaeology (ARCHLGY 81)

(Formerly CLASSART 81.) This course will introduce you to the material culture of the ancient Roman world, from spectacular imperial monuments in the city of Rome to cities and roads around the Mediterranean, from overarching environmental concerns to individual human burials, from elite houses and army forts to the the lives of slaves, freedmen and gladiators. Key themes will be change and continuity over time; the material, spatial and visual workings of power; how Roman society was materially changed by its conquests and how conquered peoples responded materially to Roman rule.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 54: Introduction to World Architecture (ARTHIST 3)

This course offers an expansive introduction to architecture and urban design from the earliest human constructions to the mid-20th century. The examples range from the Americas to Europe and the Middle East and Asia. The business of architecture, its structure and materials, are addressed in each case, because designs have to leave the paper to achieve a presence in the world, and an overriding concern is to understand architecture as a sensible manifestation of particular cultures, whether societies or individuals. To the same ends, student writing assignments will involve the analysis of local space, whether a room or a building, and then the built environment at large.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

CLASSICS 54N: Archaeology in the Digital Age (ARCHLGY 54N)

Like so many fields, archaeology is being transformed by new opportunities and challenges of technologies inconceivable only a generation ago: online tourist photographs are assisting replication of an arch destroyed by terrorists, detailed scans reveal how tools were manufactured and used 2000 years ago, and excavated remains historically texture lost worlds for games like Assassin¿s Creed. These artifacts and sites allow us to recreate human pasts in different ways, but only if we can make the most of every partial clue that archaeology uncovers. How do approaches like laser scanning and digital modeling help us maximize archaeological documentation and analysis? How will 3D visualization bring archaeological finds to the public in more innovative, immersive, and democratic ways than ever before? How can we put the past into the hands of a global community anywhere and at any time through interactive digital reconstructions and physical replicas? Can 4D approaches integrating time help us understand ancient social processes through digital approaches? What ethical questions of practice, ownership, and display arise as archaeology confronts each of these new opportunities? How do such developments force us to reexamine the complex ways in which technologies are changing our relationship with the human past? This seminar bridges the theoretical and the practical, allowing students to develop hands-on projects¿using 3D analysis of objects on campus¿that ask fundamental questions about how artifacts worked in the past, how they speak in the present, and how new digital tools can transform their voices in the future. Trips to collections on campus and in the area, as well as visits from diverse experts in the field and case studies from the instructor¿s own excavation (a Roman shipwreck of marble architectural materials) allow engagement with emerging technological approaches to the archaeological record.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 56: Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval (ARTHIST 1A)

This course explores monuments from the pre-historic through the medieval periods with a focus on their sensory dimensions. How did the ritual and the décor manipulate the viewer and produced different states of consciousness in the cave art of Lascaux? How was power structured as a sensual experience in the empires of Assyria, Babylon, and Egypt? How did the concept of democracy realize itself in the development of pictorial and sculptural naturalism in Classical Athens? We will engage some of the greatest monuments of human civilization produced in the most distant past in places far away and bring them nearby engaging also with the art at the Cantor Museum and the facsimiles of manuscripts at the Stanford Libraries. The lectures introduce major monuments, while the discussion sections allow students to gain new powers of observation and deepen their analytical skills through a direct engagement with objects on display at the museum.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 57: Introduction to Digital Archaeology (ARCHLGY 47)

While the tools of Digital Archaeology frequently change, using digital tools has been part of the discipline for decades. These tools and approaches provide new forms of research, visualization, and outreach to archaeological investigations. This course is designed to introduce students of archaeology to the digital research methods useful to the discipline, and provide them with hands-on experience in three types of digital method: digital mapping, visualization, and 3D modeling. The goal of the course is for students to learn about the state of digital archaeology, to become familiar with common methods, and become aware of the resources available for research.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 58: Egypt in the Age of Heresy (AFRICAAM 58A, AFRICAST 58, ARCHLGY 58)

Perhaps the most controversial era in ancient Egyptian history, the Amarna period (c.1350-1334 BCE) was marked by great sociocultural transformation, notably the introduction of a new 'religion' (often considered the world's first form of monotheism), the construction of a new royal city, and radical departures in artistic and architectural styles. This course will introduce archaeological and textual sources of ancient Egypt, investigating topics such as theological promotion, projections of power, social structure, urban design, interregional diplomacy, and historical legacy during the inception, height, and aftermath of this highly enigmatic period. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 76: Global History: The Ancient World (HISTORY 1A)

This course examines the emergence of "world empires"-- the first way of constituting a world-- in four regions of the eastern hemisphere from the first millennium BCE to the year 900 CE. It will study the pivotal role of cities, the importance of rulers, the incorporation of diverse peoples, and how the states that followed their collapse constituted new world orders through combining imitation of the vanished empire with the elaboration of the new "world religions."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 81: Ancient Empires: Near East (HISTORY 117)

Why do imperialists conquer people? Why do some people resist while others collaborate? This course tries to answer these questions by looking at some of the world's earliest empires. The main focus is on the expansion of the Assyrian and Persian Empires between 900 and 300 BC and the consequences for the ancient Jews, Egyptians, and Greeks. The main readings come from the Bible, Herodotus, and Assyrian and Persian royal inscriptions, and the course combines historical and archaeological data with social scientific approaches. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 82: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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