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11 - 20 of 190 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 9N: What Didn't Make It into the Bible (JEWISHST 4, RELIGST 4)

Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. "What Didn't Make It in the Bible" focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed f more »
Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. "What Didn't Make It in the Bible" focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed for students who are part of faith traditions that consider the bible to be sacred, as well as those who are not. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring books, groups, and ideas that eventually lost the battles of history and to keep asking the question "why." In critically examining these ancient narratives and the communities that wrote them, you will investigate how religions canonize a scriptural tradition, better appreciate the diversity of early Judaism and Christianity, understand the historical context of these religions, and explore the politics behind what did and did not make it into the bible.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 10N: Odysseus Does Dublin: Joyce's Ulysses and Modernist Myth

Upon publication nearly a century ago, Ulyssesby the Irish writer James Joyce was met by many readers with bewilderment and disgust. The story of meanderings around Dublin's districts, both posh and seamy, by a modern Odysseus and Telemachus was banned as pornographic for more than a decade in both the US and UK. Nevertheless, the book rapidly gained recognition as a masterpiece and is now considered one of the most important works of world literature. This seminar will be devoted to a careful reading of the entire text within a number of frames, including classical Greek epic models and ideas about myth, as well as more immediate social, political, and artistic contexts. No previous familiarity with Joyce's work is assumed.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Martin, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 11G: Intermediate Greek: Prose

Transition to reading Greek prose through focusing on a range of mythological topics. Students will build upon knowledge of morphology and syntax acquired in beginning Greek and develop confidence and proficiency in reading Greek texts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Wilker, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 11L: Intermediate Latin: Introduction to Literature

Phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Readings in prose and poetry. Analysis of literary language, including rhythm, meter, word order, narrative, and figures of speech.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Klopacz, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 12G: Intermediate Greek: Tragedy

Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Bork, H. (PI)

CLASSICS 12L: Intermediate Latin: Greeks, Trojans, and Romans in the Bay of Naples

In this class you will practice with and reinforce the advanced vocabulary, forms, and syntax of classical Latin you have previously acquired by reading works of Latin poetry (Aeneid VI) and prose (Pliny's letters to Tacitus concerning the eruption of Vesuvius). While the primary emphasis of this course is on developing fluency in reading Latin, you will have opportunities to discuss and research the geographical, art historical, biographical, political, and literary issues raised by the readings. This course will include a spring break (March 20 ¿ 29, 2020) trip to the Bay of Naples to see first hand the sites that served as inspiration for the Latin authors. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Klopacz, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 12N: Income and wealth inequality from the Stone Age to the present (HISTORY 12N)

Rising inequality is a defining feature of our time. How long has economic inequality existed, and when, how and why has the gap between haves and have-nots widened or narrowed over the course of history? This seminar takes a very long-term view of these questions. It is designed to help you appreciate dynamics and complexities that are often obscured by partisan controversies and short-term perspectives, and to provide solid historical background for a better understanding of a growing societal concern.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Scheidel, W. (PI)

CLASSICS 13G: Intermediate Greek: Homer's Odyssey

Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Gaggioli, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 13L: Intermediate Latin: Vergil

Vocabulary, forms and syntax. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Dubit, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 14: Greek and Latin Roots of English

(Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Gardner, N. (PI)
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