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121 - 130 of 190 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 205B: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 105B)

Review of Greek grammar and instruction in Greek prose composition skills. Begins sixth week of Winter Quarter and continues through Spring Quarter. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Greek. First-year graduate students register for 205A/B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Stephens, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 206A: The Semantics of Grammar

206A: Tense, Aspect, Argument Structure, Location. 206B: Quantification, Plurality, Modification, Negation, Modality. Supplements CLASSICS 104A/204A. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 206B: The Semantics of Grammar

206A: Tense, Aspect, Argument Structure, Location. 206B: Quantification, Plurality, Modification, Negation, Modality. Supplements CLASSICS 104B/204B. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 207L: The Pastoral in Post-Classical Literature 

For modern readers, the words pastoral and bucolic evoke picturesque scenes of pastureland and flocks of sheep an Arcadian paradise first envisaged by the classical poets Theocritus and Virgil. This weekly reading group traces the long legacy of pastoral poetry in post-classical Latin literature, including the works of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Sannazaro, and Milton. Through the songs of their shepherds, we will rediscover the pastoral landscape as a site of intergenerational conflict between poets from antiquity to the Renaissance. All readings will be done in the original Latin. Prerequisite: at least one full year of Latin or permission of instructor. Course may be taken independently or as an optional extra weekly session of CLASSICS 102L Advanced Latin: Virgil's Eclogues and Georgics (in the latter case, please register for CLASSICS 102L).
Last offered: Winter 2016

CLASSICS 208L: Latin 400-1700 CE (CLASSICS 6L, RELIGST 173X)

Readings in later Latin, drawing on the vast bodies of texts from the late antique, medieval and early modern periods. Each week students will prepare selections in advance of class meetings; class time will be devoted to translation and discussion. Students taking this course will gain exposure to a wide range of later Latin texts; hone translation skills; and develop an awareness of the grammatical and stylistic features of post-classical Latin. The course is aimed both at classical Latinists seeking to broaden their reading experience and at medievalists and early modernists seeking to consolidate their Latin language skills. May be repeat for credit.nnPrior experience in Latin is required, preferably CLASSICS 11L. Equivalent accepted. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Does not fulfill the language requirement in Classical Studies track.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 209L: Advanced Latin: Ovid (CLASSICS 102L)

In his Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto, stemming from his banishment to the Black Sea coast in 8 CE, Ovid ostensibly addresses his wife, friends and patrons back in Rome, longing for the chance to return. These 'Sadnesses' and 'Letters from Pontus' use the same meter as his love poems, namely elegiac couplets, but by contrast they sound a nostalgic note. Ovid complains bitterly about conditions in his new location, so far from his beloved city of Rome. In reading a rich sample of these exile poems we'll assess the poet's self-representation, his apparent clash of art and politics, and more generally the nature of literary exile and cultural landscapes. As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Sample reading: Ovid, Epistulae ex Ponto book 1 (ed. Garth Tissol, 2014).As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Parker, G. (PI)

CLASSICS 212: Introduction to Latin Epigraphy

(Formerly CLASSGEN 219.) How to engage with epigraphic evidence through translation and contextualization of inscriptions. The materiality of inscriptions, geographical variation, and current scholarly debates in scholarship. How to use this evidence in research.
Last offered: Winter 2017

CLASSICS 213: Proseminar: Documentary Papyrology

The focus will be on documentary papyrology. Students will be introduced to the basics of the discipline.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

CLASSICS 214: Proseminar: Ancient Numismatics

Graduate proseminar. Introductory overview of the heterogeneous coinages of antiquity, from the earliest coins of the Mediterranean to classical and Hellenistic Greek coins, Roman Republican, Imperial and provincial coinages as well as various ancient Oriental coinages. Topics include: numismatic terminology; techniques of coin production in antiquity; numismatic methodology (die studies; hoard studies; metrological analyses); quantifying coin production and ancient financial history; coins vs. other forms of money in antiquity; the study of ancient coinages in the Early Modern world. Students are expected to prepare talks on specific topics to be agreed upon. Required for ancient history graduate students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Scheidel, W. (PI)

CLASSICS 215: Paleography of Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts (DLCL 209, HISTORY 309G, RELIGST 204)

Introductory course in the history of writing and of the book, from the late antique period until the advent of printing. Opportunity to learn to read and interpret medieval manuscripts through hands-on examination of original materials in Special Collections of Stanford Libraries as well as through digital images. Offers critical training in the reading of manuscripts for students from departments as diverse as Classics, History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, English, and the Division of Languages Cultures and Literatures.
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