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21 - 30 of 82 results for: CIGH::*

BIOE 70Q: Medical Device Innovation

BIOE 70Q invites students to apply design thinking to the creation of healthcare technologies. Students will learn about the variety of factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on design projects, invent their own solutions to clinical needs. Guest instructors will include engineers, doctors, entrepreneurs, and others who have helped bring ideas from concept to clinical use.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 371: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (MED 271)

This course ( BIOE371, MED271, OIT587) exposes students to the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative health technologies to help patients around the world. Non-communicable diseases, such as metabolic and chronic respiratory disease, now account for 7 in 10 deaths worldwide, presenting a need for health technology innovation that works across diverse global markets. Early in the quarter, faculty will provide an overview of the dynamic global health technology industry and how the position of the US is shifting relative to other geographies. Then, the course will explore four important regions; Europe, China, Japan, and India and key similarities and differences between them. Additionally, students will engage with expert guests from the industry in debating controversial topics affecting health technology innovation in these regions. Finally, students will have the opportunity to network and explore career paths in the broad field of global health technology innovation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 372: Design for Service Innovation (HRP 274, MED 274)

(Same as OIT 343/01) Open to graduate students from all schools and departments. An experiential project course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services to address the needs of medically patients. Project teams partner with "safety net" hospitals and clinics to find better ways to deliver care to the low income and uninsured patients these institutions serve. Students learn proven innovation processes from experienced GSB, d. school, and SoM faculty, interface with students from across the university, and have the opportunity to see their ideas translated into improvements in the quality and efficiency of healthcare in the real world. Prerequisite: admission to the course is by application only. Applications available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu. Applications must be submitted by November 16, 2011.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2012 | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturer more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CEE 70N: Water, Public Health, and Engineering

Preference to frosh. Linkages between water, wastewater and public health, with an emphasis on engineering interventions. Topics include the history of water and wastewater infrastructure development in the U.S. and Europe; evolution of epidemiological approaches for water-related health challenges; biological and chemical contaminants in water and wastewater and their management; and current trends and challenges in access to water and sanitation around the world. Identifying ways in which freshwater contributes to human health; exposure routes for water- and sanitation-illness. Classifying illnesses by pathogen type and their geographic distribution. Identifying the health and economic consequences of water- and sanitation-related illnesses; costs and benefits of curative and preventative interventions. Interpreting data related to epidemiological and environmental concepts. No previous experience in engineering is required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 265D: Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

Economic, social, political, and technical aspects of sustainable water supply and sanitation service provision in developing countries. Service pricing, alternative institutional structures including privatization, and the role of consumer demand and community participation in the planning process. Environmental and public health considerations, and strategies for serving low-income households. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, see jennadavis.stanford.edu for application.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 277S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 177S)

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 374W: Advanced Topics in Water, Health and Development

Advanced topics in water, health and development. Emphasis on low-and-middle-income countries. Class content varies according to interests of students. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Davis, J. (PI)

COMPMED 84Q: Globally Emerging Zoonotic Diseases

Preference to sophomores. Infectious diseases impacting veterinary and human health around the world today. Mechanisms of disease, epidemiology, and underlying diagnostic, treatment and control principles associated with these pathogens.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Felt, S. (PI)
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