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1 - 10 of 36 results for: CHILATST

CHILATST 1SI: English Language Learner Tutoring and Curriculum Development

The principal purpose of this course is to support Habla tutors in developing lesson plans and strategies to implement during their tutoring sessions with English language learners. The course equips students with a foundational understanding of English as a second language, practical experience with developing educational materials for language learning, and a collaborative space to reflect on the tutoring experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

CHILATST 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CSRE 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CHILATST 21: Visual Storytelling in Community: The Casa Zapata Mural Archive & History Project

This mural history project was created by Stanford students at Casa Zapata over several years to explore and archive over twenty murals that are painted on the interior and exterior walls of this undergraduate residence in Lucie Stern Hall, Stanford University. The sheer number of painted works, many done with the direct involvement of students in collaboration with professional artists has become one of the largest repositories of visual storytelling through murals on any U.S. college campus. This course will explore the artists, content and methods of creating this treasure of work compiled over 4 decades. Research and programs to exhibit the murals are a critical component to the archive project. Student projects will contribute to efforts to share this body of mural works that has remained largely invisible to the public and critically unexplored at Stanford.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

CHILATST 67: Contemporary Chicano & Latino Literature

What does it mean to be Chicano and Latino in the United States today? And, how have U.S. writers portrayed the evolution of a Latino identity as it has changed from the age of the Civil Rights Movement to the age of Twitter? This class provides students with an overview of 20th and 21st century U.S. Latino/a literature by focusing on American authors writing after the 1960s to the present. We will read a range of writers, including Gloria Anzaldúa, Sandra Cisneros, Héctor Tobar, and Junot Díaz, and examine how these authors grapple with the artistic task of representing the different national cultures and histories (Mexican American, Puerto Rican, etc.) that inform the U.S. Latino experience. Throughout the quarter we will explore how these fictional narratives offer insights into the topics of American identity, immigration, assimilation, class status, Women of Color feminism, gender and sexuality. In addition, we will also consider contemporary representations from film and television, ultimately working toward a comprehensive analysis of how literary genres and popular cultural contribute to the meaning of Latinidad in the U.S.
Last offered: Winter 2016

CHILATST 109: GENTE: An incubator for transforming national narratives

Nearly 80,000 individuals who identify as Latino or Latina, turn 18 every MONTH in the United States alone.. Yet despite the rapid growth in numbers and a presence on this continent that predates the country itself, Latina/os are still spoken of largely through the lens of immigration, and primarily during the window of election seasons. This course will design, engage, and deliver human centered strategies and relational activations for transforming national narratives while advancing well being. Our core questions include:n - Who defines a people, and who is involved in definition making? n - What are the ways to engage story beyond marketing concepts into a platform for human connection? n - How does one ¿hack¿ a national narrative?n - How do relational activations like pop up dinners and listening parties create personal doorways for transformation that can be scaled without sacrificing quality?nnPlease note, GENTE is more than an identity-based course. It is initiative that designs blueprints for change-making across identities by curating stories, values and common histories of individuals into a shared future of well being.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

CHILATST 110: Sabias Creadoras y Activistas: Chicana/Latina Ways of Knowing

(Open only to Undergraduates.) Chicana feminists have critically challenged masculine nationalist discourse as well as European and North American feminism. Through this course, we examine the diversity in thinking and methodology that defines these discourses from interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives to understand the differential access to power experienced by Chicanas. How intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality are informed and practiced by everyday lived experiences such as family life, religion/spirituality, education, and work; political/civic engagement is also central to this course.
Last offered: Spring 2017

CHILATST 111: Curander@s, remedios y espiritualidad: Chican@/Latin@ healing practices

Understanding Chican@/Latin@ curandero traditions, remedios, brujeria and spirituality provides insights into the importance of such healing practices in everyday Chican@/Latin@ life. Through this course, we examine curanderismo and folk healing practices from interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives to understand the mestizo and indigenous healing practices of Chican@s/Latin@s. How intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality inform such practices and traditions is also explored in this course.
Last offered: Spring 2020

CHILATST 112: (Afro)Latinx in Reggaeton & Hip Hop: Blackness, Feminisms, and Performances (AFRICAAM 112X)

This course surveys Latinx participation in Hip-Hop and Reggaetón, highlighting women artists, the Hispanophone Caribbean, and U.S. urban centers. Students will analyze texts, lyrics, performance, and social issues the music addresses from multiple disciplinary perspectives.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Bruno, S. (PI)

CHILATST 114: Brujas and Blackness: Transnational Feminist Perspectives of AfroLatinidad

Blackness and brujería are taboo topics within Latinx communities; both typically connote negative imagery and are actively avoided. Recently, the bruja identity has been reclaimed by many AfroLatinx women who see it as an outward expression of their AfroLatinidad and source of personal empowerment. Lara (2005) describes this as a bruja positionality ¿ ¿the re-membering, revising, and constructing of knowledge as well as participation in other forms of social change¿built on healing the internalized desconocimientos that demonize la Bruja and the transgressive spirituality and sexuality that she represents¿ (p 13). Latinx spiritual practices such as espiritismo, Santeria, curanderismo, among others, will become avenues through which will explore key themes in Black/Latina/Chicana feminisms, including the politics of representation, stigmatization, multiple forms of state and interpersonal violence, intersecting forms of oppression, economic justice, reproductive justice, queerness/sexu more »
Blackness and brujería are taboo topics within Latinx communities; both typically connote negative imagery and are actively avoided. Recently, the bruja identity has been reclaimed by many AfroLatinx women who see it as an outward expression of their AfroLatinidad and source of personal empowerment. Lara (2005) describes this as a bruja positionality ¿ ¿the re-membering, revising, and constructing of knowledge as well as participation in other forms of social change¿built on healing the internalized desconocimientos that demonize la Bruja and the transgressive spirituality and sexuality that she represents¿ (p 13). Latinx spiritual practices such as espiritismo, Santeria, curanderismo, among others, will become avenues through which will explore key themes in Black/Latina/Chicana feminisms, including the politics of representation, stigmatization, multiple forms of state and interpersonal violence, intersecting forms of oppression, economic justice, reproductive justice, queerness/sexuality/lesbianism, and strategies of empowerment and resistance. Through a variety of course materials ¿ academic articles, personal reflections, performance, and art ¿ we will critically examine the construction of Afro-indigenous feminist identities within the contexts of Latin America and the diaspora.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Cortes, K. (PI)

CHILATST 124A: Latinx Literature (CSRE 124A, ENGLISH 124A)

Emerging from the demographic, political, and cultural shifts of the late twentiethnncentury, LatinX Literature flourishes in the twenty-first century as a hemisphericallynnAmerican corpus of texts. Like both ChicanX and Puerto Rican literatures before it,nnLatinX Literature emerges from various movements for social justice to challengennboth the Anglo and the Hispanic established literary traditions of the Americas. As anntransnational, pluralistic, heterogeneous, and dynamic category that considers thennwritings of diverse peoples with cultural ties to Latin America residing in the U.S., itnncomplicates and transgresses the linguistic, geopolitical and cultural borders ofnnthe Americas, including those of the Afro-Caribbean, Luso-Brazilian, and the NativennFirst Nations. Aligning itself with the issues, styles, and topics of the Global South,nnLatinX Literature is a product of the kind of ¿border thinking¿ that critic WalternnMignolo has described as a ¿pluriversal . . . epistemology more »
Emerging from the demographic, political, and cultural shifts of the late twentiethnncentury, LatinX Literature flourishes in the twenty-first century as a hemisphericallynnAmerican corpus of texts. Like both ChicanX and Puerto Rican literatures before it,nnLatinX Literature emerges from various movements for social justice to challengennboth the Anglo and the Hispanic established literary traditions of the Americas. As anntransnational, pluralistic, heterogeneous, and dynamic category that considers thennwritings of diverse peoples with cultural ties to Latin America residing in the U.S., itnncomplicates and transgresses the linguistic, geopolitical and cultural borders ofnnthe Americas, including those of the Afro-Caribbean, Luso-Brazilian, and the NativennFirst Nations. Aligning itself with the issues, styles, and topics of the Global South,nnLatinX Literature is a product of the kind of ¿border thinking¿ that critic WalternnMignolo has described as a ¿pluriversal . . . epistemology that interconnects thennplurality and diversity of decolonial projects.¿ Acknowledging its emergence fromnnliteral and theoretical border spaces and decolonizing epistemologies, the ¿X¿ ofnnLatinX intentionally inflects the link to an origin in LGBTQI discourses signifying ¿annmore inclusive, non-gender-binary designation for LatinX peoples¿ and as a bordernnliterature that articulates heterogeneous ways of making meaning¿. Authors maynninclude Jesus Colón, Sandra Cisneros, Helena Maria Viramontes, Christina Garcia,nnJunot Diaz, Ire´ne Lara Silva, Julia Alvarez, Américo Paredes, Daniel Alarcón,nnFrancisco Goldman, Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Tato Laviera, ErnestonnQuinonez, Erika Sanchez, Elizabeth Acevedo, Luis Valdez, Lorna Dee Cervantes,nnSilvia Moreno-Garcia, Fernando Flores, or Oscar Cásares.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
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