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41 - 50 of 111 results for: CEE ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 222A: Computer Integrated Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) Global Teamwork

AEC students engage in a crossdisciplinary, collaborative, geographically distributed, and multicultural project-based teamwork. AEC teams exercise their domain knowledge and information technologies in a multidisciplinary context focusing on the design and construction concept development phase of a comprehensive building project. Prerequisite: interview with Instructor in Autumn Quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fruchter, R. (PI)

CEE 224A: Sustainable Development Studio

(Undergraduates, see 124.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224S: Sustainable Urban Systems Seminar (CEE 124S)

The Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Seminar Series will feature speakers from academia, practice, industry, and government who are on the forefront of research and innovation in sustainable urban systems. The SUS Seminar will be open to the public; students will have the option of obtaining 1 unit of course credit based on attendance and completion of writing assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 224Y: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 227: Global Project Finance

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 230: Urban Development and Governance

Introduction to urban planning, policy, politics, and governance by a lecture team from SPUR. Focus on the U.S., California, and the Bay Area.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 235: CapaCity Design Studio

Silicon Valley's rapid expansion has created explosive urban development in a fragile and under-prepared natural context. Delicate coastal ecology and rapid urbanization (expanding technology headquarters, new residential housing, parking, services, etc.) are competing for space. The same land also serves the regional functions of transport, open space, recreation, water supply, flood protection and wastewater treatment. Compounding the problems between these competing factors are global climate change instabilities increasing the certainty of catastrophic flooding, infrastructure collapse, and other urban resilience challenges. Students will be immersed in a process that allows them to understand and spatially identify these risks, develop a vocabulary and understanding of innovative tools to respond to them, and then work with expert practitioners to create unique design responses. Students will be provided with urban design frameworks (for planning, site development, and conservatio more »
Silicon Valley's rapid expansion has created explosive urban development in a fragile and under-prepared natural context. Delicate coastal ecology and rapid urbanization (expanding technology headquarters, new residential housing, parking, services, etc.) are competing for space. The same land also serves the regional functions of transport, open space, recreation, water supply, flood protection and wastewater treatment. Compounding the problems between these competing factors are global climate change instabilities increasing the certainty of catastrophic flooding, infrastructure collapse, and other urban resilience challenges. Students will be immersed in a process that allows them to understand and spatially identify these risks, develop a vocabulary and understanding of innovative tools to respond to them, and then work with expert practitioners to create unique design responses. Students will be provided with urban design frameworks (for planning, site development, and conservation) combined with advanced sustainable design concepts (such as resource co-optimization, and adaptable infrastructure platforms, and high performance urban ecology) by working with expert lecturers and in small groups. Students will ultimately develop a series of visual and technical presentations to propose a final thesis for a local intervention that could be replicated in other coastal contexts globally. This course has been designed to develop student learning through a project-based format. Students will be organized into design teams of 3 or 4 and will have the semester to collaborate with partners on an interdisciplinary proposal including policy and design recommendations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Varga, L. (PI)

CEE 241B: Infrastructure Project Delivery (CEE 141B)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities ,and communications sectors. Analysis of how projects are designed, constructed, operated, and maintained. Focus is on public works projects in the U.S. Alternative project delivery approaches and organizational strategies. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare finance/design/build/operate/maintain project proposals.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Sedar, B. (PI)

CEE 242: Organization Design for Projects and Companies

Introduction to organizational behavior and organizational design for construction projects and companies. Class incorporates readings, individual, small group and large group case study assignments. Students use computer simulation to design real-world project organizations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 242R: Project Risk Analysis

Teaches principles and methods for quantitative modeling and mitigation of risks in project planning, design, construction and operation, using new MS Excel capabilities and standardized probability distributions. Several case studies will be covered, including ongoing work with PG&E to roll up operational risks.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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