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21 - 30 of 50 results for: CEE

CEE 207S: Understanding Energy - Essentials (CEE 107S)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Students will learn the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts ¿ and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 3 units, which includes lecture, readings and videos, assignments, and one o more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Students will learn the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts ¿ and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 3 units, which includes lecture, readings and videos, assignments, and one off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each quarter (see syllabus for updated list), but for the spring quarter may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose one field trip from approximately 8 that are offered. For the summer quarter, one off-campus field trip will be offered and required. Enroll for 4 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). This is a course for all: pre-majors and majors, with any background ¿ no prior energy knowledge necessary. For a course that covers all of this plus goes more in-depth into the technical aspects of each energy resource, check out CEE 107A/207A/ EarthSys 103 Understanding Energy offered in the autumn quarter (cannot take both for credit). This course was formerly called Energy Resources. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107A/207A/ EarthSys 103
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 220A: Building Information Modeling Workshop (CEE 120A)

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 224A: Sustainable Development Studio

(Undergraduates, see 124.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 270S: Environmental Disasters (CEE 170S)

Mining and critical review of scientific literature for environmental impacts, especially chemical contamination caused by natural and anthropogenic disasters. Focus is on the development of research review skills, critical thinking and discussion of findings.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 271F: New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability (CEE 171F)

Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Laurent, E. (PI)

CEE 274S: Hopkins Microbiology Course (BIO 274S, BIOHOPK 274, ESS 253S)

(Formerly GES 274S.) Four-week, intensive. The interplay between molecular, physiological, ecological, evolutionary, and geochemical processes that constitute, cause, and maintain microbial diversity. How to isolate key microorganisms driving marine biological and geochemical diversity, interpret culture-independent molecular characterization of microbial species, and predict causes and consequences. Laboratory component: what constitutes physiological and metabolic microbial diversity; how evolutionary and ecological processes diversify individual cells into physiologically heterogeneous populations; and the principles of interactions between individuals, their population, and other biological entities in a dynamically changing microbial ecosystem. Prerequisites: CEE 274A and CEE 274B, or equivalents.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 275P: Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs (CEE 175P)

Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stanton, C. (PI)

CEE 275S: Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 175S)

Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 276G: Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 176G)

Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)
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