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71 - 80 of 101 results for: CEE

CEE 274A: Environmental Microbiology I (BIO 273A, CHEMENG 174, CHEMENG 274)

Basics of microbiology and biochemistry. The biochemical and biophysical principles of biochemical reactions, energetics, and mechanisms of energy conservation. Diversity of microbial catabolism, flow of organic matter in nature: the carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Bacterial physiology, phylogeny, and the ecology of microbes in soil and marine sediments, bacterial adhesion, and biofilm formation. Microbes in the degradation of pollutants. Prerequisites: CHEM 33, CHEM 121 (formerly CHEM 35), and BIOSCI 41, CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188), or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CEE 275D: Environmental Policy Analysis

Environmental policy formation is a complex process involving a large number of actors making value laden interpretations of scientifically complex phenomena. This course explores the origins of this complexity and its implications for the future of environmental decision making and policy-directed environmental engineering. We will begin by asking what good environmental policy looks like, including how we set policy for groups of individuals with diverse preferences, how we value preferences across space and time, and how we account for the deep uncertainty that permeates environmental systems. We then turn to how environmental policies are actually developed, exploring the technical, cognitive, organizational, and systemic barriers to implementing ¿good¿ policy. Finally, will explore the role of scientific evidence in shaping environmental policy and the mechanisms by which policy shapes engineering and science research. Students will gain familiarity with the existing theories, met more »
Environmental policy formation is a complex process involving a large number of actors making value laden interpretations of scientifically complex phenomena. This course explores the origins of this complexity and its implications for the future of environmental decision making and policy-directed environmental engineering. We will begin by asking what good environmental policy looks like, including how we set policy for groups of individuals with diverse preferences, how we value preferences across space and time, and how we account for the deep uncertainty that permeates environmental systems. We then turn to how environmental policies are actually developed, exploring the technical, cognitive, organizational, and systemic barriers to implementing ¿good¿ policy. Finally, will explore the role of scientific evidence in shaping environmental policy and the mechanisms by which policy shapes engineering and science research. Students will gain familiarity with the existing theories, methods, and strategies used to set environmental policy; critically examine the embedded assumptions and inherent shortcomings of these approaches; and practice their thoughtful and ethical application to timely environmental challenges. Course Structure: This course combines a lecture-based introduction to critical material with extensive in-class discussion of daily readings from the policy analysis canon. As such, it is designed for PhD and Masters students across the university with an interest in exploring the effective role of science in setting public policy and comfort in reading primary literature. Upper level undergraduates are welcome with instructor consent. Assessment elements will include class participation, responses on 4 to 5 written assignments, and a take-home final. Occasional Friday recitation sessions will provide guidance on the application of policy analysis methods,
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CEE 276: Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis (CEE 178)

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 277F: Advanced Field Methods in Water, Health and Development

Field methods for assessing household stored water quality, hand contamination, behaviors, and knowledge related to water, sanitation and health. Limited enrollment. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10
Instructors: Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 280: Advanced Structural Analysis

Theoretical development and computer implementation of direct stiffness method of structural analysis; virtual work principles; computation of element stiffness matrices and load vectors; direct assembly procedures; equation solution techniques. Analysis of two- and three-dimensional truss and frame structures, thermal loads, and substructuring and condensation techniques for large systems. Practical modeling techniques and programming assignments. Introduction to nonlinear analysis concepts. Prerequisites: elementary structural analysis and matrix algebra.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CEE 284: Finite Element Methods in Structural Dynamics

Computational methods for structural dynamics analysis of discrete and continuous systems in free and forced vibration; finite element formulation; modal analysis; numerical methods; introduction to nonlinear dynamics; advanced topics. Prerequisites: 280, 283.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Law, K. (PI)

CEE 285A: Advanced Structural Concrete Behavior and Design

Behavior and design of reinforced and prestressed concrete for building and bridge design. Topics will include flexural behavior, prestressed concrete design, and two-way slab design & analysis, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CEE 291: Solid Mechanics

Vector and tensor algebra; vector and tensor analysis; kinetics, basic physical quantities, global and local balance laws, representative material models of 1D and 3D continua at small strains; thermodynamics of general internal variable formulations of inelasticity; integration algorithms for inelastic 1D and 3D materials; basic solution techniques for boundary value problems in 1D and 3D.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CEE 292X: Battery Systems for Transportation and GridnServices (EE 292X)

Driven by high-capacity battery systems, electrification is transforming mobility solutions and the grid that powers them. This course provides an introduction to battery systems for transportation and grid services: cell technologies, topology selection, thermal and aging management, safety monitoring, AC and DC charging, and operation control/optimization. Invited experts introduce students to the state¿of¿theart of each topic. The course is aimed at mezzanine and graduate levels students who wish to design battery systems, model them from data, integrate them into applications, or just learn about them. It can be taken for 1 unit (Credit/no Credit) for attending seminars, or for 3 units (letter grade only) for also doing an optional project. Prerequisites: No prerequisites needed for taking the course for 1 unit. Relevant background in selected project area is recommended, for example, CEE 272R for grid applications; EE 253 for AC or DC charging and battery controller design; CEE 322, CS 229 or EE 104 for data-based projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3

CEE 299: Independent Study in Civil Engineering for CEE-MS Students

Directed study for CEE-MS students on subjects of mutual interest to students and faculty. Student must obtain faculty sponsor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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