2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 101 results for: CEE

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32R: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 343A)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 63: Weather and Storms (CEE 263C)

Daily and severe weather and global climate. Topics: structure and composition of the atmosphere, fog and cloud formation, rainfall, local winds, wind energy, global circulation, jet streams, high and low pressure systems, inversions, el Niño, la Niña, atmosphere/ocean interactions, fronts, cyclones, thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, pollutant transport, global climate and atmospheric optics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 80N: Engineering the Built Environment: An Introduction to Structural Engineering

In this seminar, students will be introduced to the history of modern bridges, buildings and other large-scale structures. Classes will include presentations on transformations in structural design inspired by the development of new materials, increased understanding of hazardous overloads and awareness of environmental impacts. Basic principles of structural engineering and how to calculate material efficiency and structural safety of structural forms will be taught using case studies. The course will include a field trip to a Bay Area large-scale structure, hands-on experience building a tower and computational modeling of bridges, and a paper and presentation on a structure or structural form of interest to the student. The goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding and appreciation of modern structures, influences that have led to new forms, and the impact of structural design on society and the environment. Students from all backgrounds are welcome.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

CEE 100: Managing Sustainable Building Projects

Managing the life cycle of buildings from the owner, designer, and contractor perspectives emphasizing sustainability goals; methods to define, communicate, coordinate, and manage multidisciplinary project objectives including scope, quality, life cycle cost and value, schedule, safety, energy, and social concerns; roles, responsibilities, and risks for project participants; virtual design and construction methods for product, organization, and process modeling; lifecycle assessment methods; individual writing assignment related to a real world project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 101B: Mechanics of Fluids

Physical properties of fluids and their effect on flow behavior; equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow, including the special case of hydrostatics; continuity, energy, and momentum principles; control volume analysis; laminar and turbulent flows; internal and external flows in specific engineering applications including pipes and open channels; elements of boundary-layer theory. The Tuesday lectures, which are preparation for the labs, will start at 12:30pm. Lab experiments will illustrate conservation principles and flows of real fluids, analysis of errors and modeling of simple fluid systems. Students seeking to take this course without the laboratory will need to enroll in CEE 162A but must get permission first from the instructor. Prerequisites: E14, Physics 41, Math 51, or CME 100.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

CEE 101C: Geotechnical Engineering

Introduction to the principles of soil mechanics. Soil classification, shear strength and stress-strain behavior of soils, consolidation theory, analysis and design of earth retaining structures, introduction to shallow and deep foundation design, slope stability. Lab projects. Prerequisite: ENGR 14. Recommended: 101A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Borja, R. (PI)

CEE 101D: Computations in Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE 201D)

Computational and visualization methods in the design and analysis of civil and environmental engineering systems. Focus is on applications of MATLAB. How to develop a more lucid and better organized programming style.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each fall (see syllabus for updated list), but may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose two field trips from approximately 8 that are offered. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter ¿ students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

CEE 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints